WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 |

«Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry Questions about Structure: Setting 1. Where does this story happen? Does the story happen in the country or ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry

Questions about Structure: Setting

1. Where does this story happen? Does the story happen in the country or the city?

This story happens in the small country town on Chincoteague, an island four

miles off the coast of Virginia. Chincoteague is only seven miles long and

averages 2l inches above sea level. Also important to the story is Assateague

Island, an outrider island protecting Chincoteague from the Atlantic Ocean. This

island is 33 miles long and is a wildlife refuge for geese, ducks, and the wild pony herd that is central to the story.

2. What is the mood or atmosphere of the place? Is it cheerful and sunny or dark and bleak? What is the weather like?

The town where this story happens is a friendly little place where there is a lot of community spirit and involvement. People know each other and look out for each other. The family in the story is happy and the children are loved and well trained.

It takes place in a part of the country where winter is short and summer lasts long, which adds to the sunny feeling of the story. Only one storm happens during the story, as only a few “storms” happen in the lives of the generally happy characters.

3. Is the setting a real or an imaginary place?

This book is based on a true story. Chincoteague Island and the Beebe family really exist, and the events in the story all really happened. The author compiled, rearranged and edited all the information to make a strong story line. Pony Penning Day still happens every year!

4. Among what kinds of people is the story set? What is their economic class and how do they live?

The people in this story are middle class, small town folks. There are two basic groups—the horse people and the water people. Everyone seems to have a place in the community and there is harmony. The conflicts in the story come about because of circumstances or inner turmoil rather than social problems in the town.

5. How long a period of time does the story cover?

This story takes place over about a year and a half. It begins in early spring when Paul and Maureen are looking forward to Pony Penning Day four months away and begin to earn money to buy the Phantom. It ends a little after the next Pony Penning Day at the end of July when they have raced the Phantom, won the race, 1 © 2010 The Center for Literary Education and decided to set her free. This passage of time represents a big change in their level of maturity.

6. In what time of life for the main character do the events happen? Does setting the story in this particular time of their lives make the story better?

The book doesn’t tell us exactly how old Paul and Maureen are, but we can tell that they are young people on the verge of growing up. Having been well trained, they are both responsible and respectful of their elders. Still, they struggle to be free to make their own decisions and want to be considered old enough to do so.

Early in the story they indulge the childish fantasy of wanting desperately to own a wild thing, a desire common to man. Their despair when these plans go awry and the horses are bought by someone else is typical of youth. Youth’s inexperience breeds impatience and fear that our dreams will never come true.

Placing this conflict at this time of life definitely makes a better story: the intense passion of youth faced with uncontrollable circumstances makes great story material.

NOTES:

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

–  –  –

2. What do the characters look like and what adjectives describe them?

Paul is a carefree young boy with an intense longing in his heart to own the wild pony named Phantom. He is industrious and determined, which are shown by his earning the money to buy the horse in only four months before Pony Penning Day. He loves and respects his grandparents, his elders, and his sister. He feels deeply and passionately about his life. He obeys authority, a quality which helps him find the Phantom on Assateague.

Maureen is Paul’s younger sister and constant companion. She joins him wholeheartedly in his pursuit of the Phantom. She also works hard to earn the money they need. Smart and resourceful, she shows spunk when she and Paul have to decide who will ride the pony in the big race. She chafes at the restrictions placed upon her because she is a girl.





Grandpa Beebe is a spry, loving surrogate parent to the two young protagonists. He owns a horse ranch, a good home for the children. Grandpa speaks with an accent and is very colorful. He talks about the “whiskers” in his ears. He loves to tease the children and hold them in suspense. He seems gruff sometimes, but they know he has a heart of gold.

He is very involved in their lives and feels their pain and their triumph.

Grandma Beebe is a strong, kind woman who loves the children and is very concerned about their well-being. She reminds them to do their chores, eat right, get enough sleep, and be careful. This is sometimes frustrating to them since these things aren’t as

–  –  –

The Pied Piper is the stallion on Assateague Island. He is the leader of the herd of wild ponies and Misty’s sire. He is completely wild and wants Phantom for himself. He never gives up calling to her after her capture, trumpeting across the channel. Because of his opposition to Paul’s desire to own the Phantom, the Pied Piper is an important antagonist in the story.

The Phantom is the mare from Assateague Island and the Pied Piper’s mate. Misty is her foal. Her name is symbolic of her nature, for she has avoided capture in three previous round-ups. In trying to discourage Paul about his fantasy of catching her, Grandpa says he’s not sure whether she really exists or is imaginary—a combination of wind, light, and shadow.

Misty is the Phantom’s foal. Since she is captured as a foal, she is never really wild. Her spirit is free, but she adjusts to being tamed and is happy with the children.

3. What do the protagonists think is the most important thing in life?

At the beginning of the story, Paul and Maureen think the most important thing in life is owning the wild pony, Phantom, and her foal, Misty. They go through an agonizing disappointment when they catch them only to lose them again in auction to Mr. Foster and his son Freddy.

4. Do the characters’ priorities change over the course of the story?

Once Paul and his sister achieve their goal, they find owning the Phantom to be less important than they thought. Having secured the two horses, and having won the yearly race with the Phantom, Paul’s thoughts turn to the needs of his horses. Misty seems happy enough with him and his family, yet Phantom remains restless. A longing haunts her features. When the ocean sings its storm songs, Paul can sense Phantom’s longing to crash into it, to become one with the wild elements once more. Paul cannot rest in his ownership of Phantom when she herself doesn’t want to be owned. Soon Paul’s love for Phantom overrides his desire to possess her, and he sets her free.

5. Are the protagonists sympathetic characters? Do you identify with them and hope they will succeed?

The children are sympathetic characters. Most children long to possess wild beauty. Who has not captured lightning bugs in a jar only to watch their flames weaken and subside?

The joy of possession is swallowed up by remorse for having subdued the wild beauty that first attracted them. Paul and Maureen struggle with their conflicting desires either to satisfy themselves or to satisfy the animal they’ve grown to love and understand. In the end, Paul and Maureen’s desire to preserve the wild beauty of the Phantom and to see her satisfied and at peace overrides their desire to satisfy themselves. Phantom’s joy becomes their object. While the youngest readers will identify with Paul and Maureen’s desire to 4 © 2010 The Center for Literary Education own the beautiful horse, older readers may also identify with the bittersweet pleasure that comes from sacrificing for someone else’s benefit.

NOTES:

___________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

5 © 2010 The Center for Literary Education Questions about Structure: Conflict and Plot

1. What does the protagonist want? Is he trying to capture something?

There are two things that Paul wants more than anything. He wants to be considered grown up by his grandpa and the men in the town, and he wants to capture and own the wild pony, Phantom. These two desires have conflicting implications, of course. You might ask your class whether Paul can have both at the same time.

2. Does he attempt to overcome a physical obstacle outside of himself?

There are several physical obstacles that Paul has to overcome in order to own the Phantom. First, he has to catch her! He is old enough now to ride on the round-up crew, so he has a chance. The Phantom has quite a history of evading capture, however. (Have students find these examples in the book.) Even if Paul manages to capture the Phantom, other obstacles bar his way. For instance, he has to buy her from the Fire Department, which means he has to find ways to make the $100 fee. (You might talk about the ways that Paul and Maureen earned the money to buy the ponies.) Finally, in order to buy the Phantom, Paul has to be the first to offer the fee. As it turns out, Mr. Foster buys the Phantom before Paul and Maureen have the chance to make their offer.

3. Is the conflict also an internal one?

Paul also faces internal conflicts in this story. He is full of the intense passion of a young person wanting something desperately and being afraid that he won’t get it. When he finds out that Mr. Foster has already bought the ponies he has worked so hard to get, his disappointment is nearly unbearable. This is a great place in the story to discuss similar feelings your students may have had. The girls might identify with Maureen’s frustration about being left out just because she is a girl.

Paul also struggles with the need to be obedient to authority when he would rather make his own decisions, an experience common to every young person coming into adulthood.

Paul has to obey Grandma when she wants him to eat, sleep, slow down, and stay home when the storm is threatening. He has things he wants to do and thinks her worry insignificant. He has to obey Mr. Maddox, the round-up leader when he asks him to go after a stray even though he thinks the detour will put him out of the race for the ponies.

In a way, these struggles with authority foreshadow Paul’s climactic decision to free the Phantom. In each case, Paul gets a little practice at denying his own immature impulses for the sake of more grown-up priorities. His decision to let Phantom go back to the wild is a kind of culmination of this process.

4. Why can’t the protagonist have what he wants? Does geography, his age or other people stand in his way?

–  –  –

5. Are there other things in the story that distract the characters from their main goal?



Pages:   || 2 |


Similar works:

«Diversity on the doorstep: coexistence between neighbours in socially and ethnically heterogeneous residential buildings Maxime Felder* © by the author(s) (*) University of Geneva, Pont d’Arve 40, 1211 Geneva, +49 15751101271 maxime.felder@unige.ch Paper presented at the RC21 International Conference on “The Ideal City: between myth and reality. Representations, policies, contradictions and challenges for tomorrow's urban life” Urbino (Italy) 27-29 August 2015....»

«Everyday Technology IP433P Introducing the smartlux DIGITAL portable video magnifier Your ideal reading companion This lightweight digital magnifier is the latest generation of the highly successful smartlux DIGITAL. Featuring a 5 inch, anti‑reflective screen and using only 3 buttons, simplicity really is at the heart of your future reading companion. Find out more by searching for product code HC99 in the RNIB online shop: www.rnib.org.uk/shop Welcome We’re delighted to introduce our...»

«INVESTING Conflict Risk, Environmental Challenges IN STABILITY and the Bottom-Line Featuring Articles by: John Bray (Control Risks Group) Jason Switzer (IISD) and Mareike Hussels (UNEP FI) Daniel Wagner (Asian Development Bank) Michael Kelly (KPMG) Copyright © 2004 United Nations Environment Programme and International Institute for Sustainable Development This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission...»

«The demand for road-based passenger mobility in India: 1950-2030 and relevance for developing and developed countries Sanjay Kumar Singh Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur India e-mail: sanjay@iitk.ac.in EJTIR, 6, no. 3 (2006), pp. 247-274 Received: July 2005 Accepted: February 2006 The main aim of the paper is to estimate the demand for road-based passenger mobility in India and subsequently project the energy demand and CO2 emissions resulting...»

«Return to Contents Return to Contents Return to Contents FOREWORD The Theater Missile Defense (TMD) Extended Test Range Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) comprises two volumes. Volume I begins with the Executive Summary and Acronyms and Abbreviations. Section 1.0 of the Final EIS contains the introduction. Section 2.0 contains the additions and revisions to the Draft EIS and to the Supplement to the Draft EIS. Section 3.0 contains the responses to comments that were made on the two...»

«Studying Social Studies: Using Personal Narratives to Explore the Shifting Social Studies Curriculum Item type text; Electronic Thesis Authors Tejeda, Victoria Alexandria Publisher The University of Arizona. Rights Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission...»

«Translated excerpt Richard von Schirach Die Nacht der Physiker. Heisenberg, Hahn, Weizsäcker und die deutsche Bombe Berenberg Verlag, Berlin 2013 ISBN 978-3-937384-54-2 pp. 11-28 Richard von Schirach The Night of the Physicists. Operation Epsilon: Heisenberg, Hahn, Weizsäcker and the German bomb Translated by Simon Pare Haus Publishing Ltd, London 2014 ISBN 978-1-908323-56-9 pp. 1-18 © 2014 Haus Publishing Ltd, London Werner Heisenberg, 1936. © 2013 Haus Publishing Ltd, London PROLOGUE The...»

«1 “Nose Rings and Bellybutton Things Counseling the Next Generation” This.pdf document contains the course materials you must read. Simply keep scrolling down and read every page. To receive CEU credit after reading this file, please follow the directions at the end of the course. Peachtree is approved to provide continuing education services by the National Association of Alcohol and Drug Addiction Counselors (NAADAC) and the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC), as well as by...»

«ALL-MEDIA GUIDE TO FAIR AND CROSSTO FAIR AND CROSSCULTURAL REPORTING CULTURAL REPORTING Stephen Stockwell and Paul Scott 1 A ‘nuts and bolts’ handbook on cross-cultural media work in Australia, covering. • ethnic communities • indigenous Australia • finding contacts • effective cross-cultural communication • relevant legislation and codes of practice • MEAA code of ethics The All-Media Guide to Fair and Cross-Cultural Reporting is a useful day-to-day tool for dealing with the...»

«The Speeches of Adolf Hitler 1921 – 1941 Munich, Gathering of the SA Speech of November 9, 1921 On November 9, 1921just five days after the Battle of the Hall (Saalschlacht) where fewer than fifty SA Men had beaten back more than 400 communists and Jews who had tried to disrupt Hitler's speech in the Festival Hall of the HofbrauhausAdolf Hitler addressed a gathering of SA Men. The following is what he told them: For us there are only two possibilities: either we remain German or we come...»

«UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 FORM 10-K (Mark One) þ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2015 OR o ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM TO Commission file number: 001-32567 ALON USA ENERGY, INC. (Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter) Delaware 74-2966572 (State of...»

«Page 1 of 5 Insect Bites and Stings Most stings from bees, wasps and hornets cause pain and slight swelling, but have little other effect. But, some people are allergic to stings and can develop reactions that can be life-threatening. Call an ambulance immediately if you suspect an allergic reaction soon after being stung. If you are stung by a bee and the stinger remains in the skin, then scrape out the stinger as quickly as possible. Do not pluck it out as this may squeeze more venom into the...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.