WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 |

«Anthony DiLollo, PhD, CCC-SLP Robert A. Neimeyer, PhD CONTENTS Foreword vii Preface xi Acknowledgments xvii Contributor xix Part I. Getting Oriented ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

Counseling in

Speech-Language

Pathology and

Audiology

Reconstructing

Personal Narratives

Anthony DiLollo, PhD, CCC-SLP

Robert A. Neimeyer, PhD

CONTENTS

Foreword vii

Preface xi

Acknowledgments xvii

Contributor xix

Part I. Getting Oriented 1 Chapter 1. Counseling in Communication Disorders 3 Chapter 2. What Does Counseling Really Mean 15 for Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists?

Chapter 3. The Leadership of Therapy: 31 How to Integrate Counseling into Your Clinical Practice Part II.

Theoretical Foundations 45 Chapter 4. Overview of Approaches to Counseling 47 Chapter 5. Constructivism 57 Chapter 6. Narrative Therapy 65 Chapter 7. Evidence for a Constructivist Approach to 71 Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Chapter 8. A Theory-Based Framework for Counseling 89 Part III. The Process of Counseling 107 Chapter 9. Listening for Thick Descriptions 109 Chapter 10. Facilitating Reconstruction 127 Chapter 11. Externalization and Relative Influence 143 Questioning: A Case Illustration v vi Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Chapter 12. Adaptive Counseling and Innovative 161 Moments: A Case Illustration Chapter 13. The Credulous Approach and 171 Reconstruction: A Case Illustration Part IV. The Clinician’s Toolbox 181 Chapter 14. A User’s Guide to the Clinician’s Toolbox 183 Chapter 15. Autobiography of the Problem 187 Chapter 16. The Story Mountain 195 Chapter 17. Drawing 205 Chapter 18. Dear John Letter 213 Chapter 19. The Downward Arrow 219 Chapter 20. Self-Characterization 227 Robert A. Neimeyer, Chris Constantino, and Anthony DiLollo Chapter 21. Experimenting with Experience 239 Chris Constantino, Robert A. Neimeyer, and Anthony DiLollo Chapter 22. Chair Work 255 Robert A. Neimeyer, Chris Constantino, and Anthony DiLollo Chapter 23. Play Therapy 273 Chapter 24. Therapeutic Documents

–  –  –

It is a pleasure to be asked to prepare a foreword for any good book.

But it is a special pleasure to do so when you are familiar with the authors’ work and look forward to reading chapters that you know will be thoughtfully and skillfully prepared. Students and professional clinicians in the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology will find this book an essential tool in their therapeutic practice. As I read through the concise and engaging chapters, I often found myself thinking of the many clinicians who—as the research indicates—are hesitant about counseling their clients. Although all readers and their clients will benefit from this book, it is the hesitant clinicians who will find this book especially useful.

DiLollo and Neimeyer provide the clinician with a clear theoretical rationale and intuitively appealing processes for connecting with and assisting clients with communication problems. Readers will be moved by the case illustrations that document the heroic journeys that are possible as a result of effective counseling for communication problems.

The authors explain in the preface that their goal in writing this book is “to provide an empirically informed and practically oriented manual for counseling clients with a broad range of communication disorders” (p. X). Their many years of counseling experience are necessary for achieving this goal. But it’s their thoughtful sequencing of the 26 chapters and their clear and engaging writing style that make it happen.

The early chapters provide a model that includes counseling as a natural and essential feature of the therapeutic experience for those with communication problems. The authors also document that counseling is clearly within the scope of practice for professionals in our discipline and that effective therapy and counseling are inseparable. They make the essential point that, in the vast

viiviii Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

majority of cases, we are assisting essentially healthy people who must cope with specific communication problems rather than people who need help with more basic personality issues. Of the four levels of progressively more concentrated counseling outlined in Chapter 2, the first two levels of counseling, focusing on a greater understanding of the client’s situation and the client’s ability to experiment and adapt to more effective coping, are all that is necessary for most individuals.

In Chapter 3, the authors describe the unique stance of the clinician as one of “adaptive leadership” rather than providing a service intended to “fix” the client. Rather than considering the person through the lens of the medical model where a breakdown in the system needs to be repaired, a more holistic approach is offered that considers the person as a complex adaptive system where changes to one part of the system results in changes to other parts. The primary goal of the clinician is to mobilize the client to do the work that is necessary for change to occur. Adaptive leadership by the clinician leads to adaptive change by the clients, with clients experimenting, not only with new ways of behaving, but also with new ways of conceptualizing themselves and their situations. In this chapter and throughout the book, the authors provide vivid examples of clinical experiences that illustrate the concepts and techniques that are necessary for change.





Part II (Chapters 4–8) provides clear descriptions of the theoretical foundations of counseling (humanistic therapy, behavior therapy, and cognitive therapy) and introduces the reader to the primary focus of the book, the constructivist-narrative approach.

Part III (Chapters 9–13) describes the processes that are part of the constructivist-narrative approach, with each process accompanied by a case description that is both vivid and moving.

The reader begins to appreciate that at the core of the constructivist-narrative approach is a focus on the “client as the expert” and each client’s personal narrative. Rather than being in the role of the expert or the “fixer,” the clinician has the opportunity to share an adventure with clients as they alter their relationship with their problems. The clinician’s stance is that of a curious observer and listener of the client’s current narrative. As the client’s dominant narrative is deconstructed and externalized via activities that are a natural part of the therapeutic conversation, ix Foreword the conceptualization of the situation moves from “the person as the problem” to “the problem as the problem.” The therapeutic experience becomes more about the development of a dynamic therapeutic alliance and the meaning of the activities as much or more than it is about the behavioral techniques that are a necessary but not a sufficient aspect of successful therapeutic change. The goal is to help clients to experiment with their relationship with the problem and to develop an agentic life style. Along with providing supporting empirical evidence for the effectiveness of the constructivist-narrative approach, the case illustrations in Chapters 11 and 12 bring home informative and touching examples of the power of adaptive counseling centered on the client and client’s resources and values.

Part IV (Chapters 14–25) describes the rationale and procedures associated with a variety of “tools” for working with clients from the constructivist-narrative perspective. These 12 chapters in Part IV are intended to be stand-alone chapters that can be read by the clinician as the need arises. The final section (Part V, Chapter

26) is a thoughtful addition intended to help instructors teach the constructivist counseling framework to students.

As a clinician and a person with a history of stuttering, I have often witnessed two essential changes that occur during a successful therapy experience—clients’ abilities to reconstruct their cognitive view of themselves and to successfully manage their communication problem. This book provides a concise, engaging, and effective way for the client and the clinician to facilitate those changes and create an agentic and autonomous lifestyle. I recommend it to both students in the discipline and seasoned professionals who are looking for a theoretically elegant, empirically informed, and immensely practical way of helping clients revise constraining stories of their relationship to their communication problems in the course of responsive counseling.

–  –  –

What is the role of counseling when working with people who have communication disorders? The answer, it seems, depends on who you ask! On the one hand, the official position of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASH A) and the American Academy of Audiology (A A A) is to regard it as a mandatory dimension of clinical practice, as we will see below. On the other hand, more than a few students and practitioners are leery of stepping into a territory they associate more with psychology or psychiatry than with speech-language pathology or audiology. Our goal in this brief chapter is to provide a general introduction to the concept of counseling in our fields by exploring the “disconnect” between policy and practice, and to consider prevalent myths about clinical practice that act as barriers to counseling.

A number of years ago, I was teaching a course on counseling to speech-language pathology and audiology graduate students. We had just finished a discussion of the importance of counseling and the need to get to know your client’s story when, during a break, one of the students came up to talk with me. “I have an aphasia client,” she said, “and, based on

34 Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

what we have been learning in this class, I wanted to spend our first session together getting to know her and how she feels about her life now.” “That sounds like a great idea,” I said, feeling rather pleased with myself for making an impact—until she finished her story: “But my supervisor told me that I had to follow my lesson plan because the client came here for therapy, not counseling.”

A Mandate for Counseling

As speech-language pathologists and audiologists, what we do is at least in part directed by a series of documents that have been carefully drafted by committees of our peers through our national accrediting agencies, ASH A and A A A. These documents provide detailed descriptions of the role of speech-language pathologists and audiologists, including the skills and practice patterns that are deemed appropriate given the goals of the professions.

scope of Practice and Preferred Practice Patterns

The term “counseling” is specifically and extensively referenced in key documents officially regulating practice for both speechlanguage pathology and audiology. For example, in the ASH A Scope of Practice for Speech-Language Pathology (ASH A, 2007), the wording related to counseling clearly states that clinicians should engage in “counseling individuals, families, coworkers, educators, and other persons in the community regarding acceptance, adaptation, and decision making about communication and swallowing.” Furthermore, ASH A’s document titled Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Speech-Language Pathology (ASH A, 2004) notes that counseling should be “conducted by appropriately credentialed and trained speech-language pathologists” and that it should involve “providing timely information and guidance to patients/clients, families/caregivers, and other relevant persons about the nature of communication or swallowing disorders, the course of intervention, ways to enhance outcomes, coping with disorders, and prognosis.” 5 Counseling in Communication Disorders Similarly, ASH A’s Scope of Practice for Audiology (ASH A,

2003) specifically mentions counseling in its description of “what audiologists do,” and The Preferred Practice Patterns for the Profession of Audiology (ASH A, 2006) lists counseling in Section IV, Item 23, and provides a detailed description of the process of counseling as “interactive and facilitative, wherein the communicative, psychosocial, and behavioral adjustment problems associated with auditory, vestibular, or other related disorders can be ameliorated.” Furthermore, A A A’s Scope of Practice (A A A, 2004) document describes the role of the audiologist as providing “counseling regarding the effects of hearing loss on communication and psychosocial status in personal, social, and vocational arenas.” Likewise, A A A’s Standards of Practice for Audiology (A A A, 2012) indicates that audiologists must provide counseling to “improve a person’s use of residual auditory and/or vestibular function or cope with the consequences of a loss of function” and to “provide support to patients and their caregivers to address the potential psychosocial impact of auditory and vestibular deficits.” In addition to scope of practice and preferred practice patterns, both A A A and ASH A provide a code of ethics that also guide clinicians in what they do. Both of these Code of Ethics documents (A A A, 2011; ASH A, 2010) mandate that clinicians should engage in all aspects of the professions within the scope of practice and provide all services competently, using all available resources to provide high-quality service.

What emerges from study of these guiding documents is that we as clinicians have a mandate to provide clinical services beyond the simple teaching of behavioral techniques or use of technology.

Moreover, it is our ethical responsibility to seek further education to ensure that we are providing services commensurate with our scope of practice and preferred practice patterns.

A Disconnect Between Principles and Clinical Practice As might be gleaned from the vignette at the start of this chapter, despite the clear mandate to engage in counseling embodied in the scope of practice and preferred practice patterns for both 6 Counseling in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology audiology and speech-language pathology, many clinicians historically have been reluctant to provide such services (Citron, 2000;

Clark, 1994; Crowe, 1997; Erdman, 2000; Garstecki & Erler, 1997;



Pages:   || 2 |


Similar works:

«Chapter 2 Monogamy? Exoticizing a 3,000-Year-Old Pre-Christian Western Tradition Anthropologizing Western society is a dire undertaking. Anthropological concepts were developed in Europe and North America. They are all too often notions simply derived from the way in which Western cultures distinguish that which is normal— and poses no problems—from that which is unaccustomed, strange, exotic, and raises questions calling for answers: the practices of others (see Moffat 1992: 222). This...»

«International Journal of Oceans and Oceanography ISSN 0973-2667 Vol.1 No.1 (2006), pp. 99-109 © Research India Publications http://www.ripublication.com/ijoo.htm Environmental Assessment of Heavy Metal Pollution in Bottom Sediments of Aden Port, Yemen  2 Samir M. Nasr¹, Mohamed. A. Okbah, Shaif. M. Kasem³ ¹Department of Environmental Studies, Institute of Graduate Studies and Research, University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt E-mail: samir_nasr@yahoo.com 2 National Institute of...»

«NetIQ® Password Management™ 8.8 SP8 Administration Guide September 2013 Legal Notice THIS DOCUMENT AND THE SOFTWARE DESCRIBED IN THIS DOCUMENT ARE FURNISHED UNDER AND ARE SUBJECT TO THE TERMS OF A LICENSE AGREEMENT OR A NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT. EXCEPT AS EXPRESSLY SET FORTH IN SUCH LICENSE AGREEMENT OR NON-DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT, NETIQ CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS DOCUMENT AND THE SOFTWARE DESCRIBED IN THIS DOCUMENT AS IS WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT...»

«WebImagesMore. pbreese@gmail.com GIVAUDAN FRAGRANCES CORPORATION v. Krivda, Dist. Court, D. New Jersey 2013 GIVAUDAN FRAGRANCES CORPORATION v. Krivda, Dist. Court, D. New Jersey 2013 GIVAUDAN FRAGRANCES CORPORATION, Plaintiff, v. JAMES KRIVDA and MANE USA, INC., Defendants. Civil Action No. 08-4409 (PGS). United States District Court, D. New Jersey. October 25, 2013.MEMORANDUM & ORDER PETER G. SHERIDAN, District Judge. This matter comes before the Court on a motion for summary judgment filed by...»

«Reglamento de Construcciones para el Municipio de Silao, Gto. 16 MAYO 2003 AÑO XC TOMO CXLI GUANAJUATO, GTO., A 16 DE MAYO DEL 2003 NUMERO 78 SEGUNDA PARTE PRESIDENCIA MUNICIPAL – SILAO, GTO. REGLAMENTO de Construcciones para el Municipio de Silao, Gto. 48 ING. CARLOS GARCÍA VILLASEÑOR, PRESIDENTE MUNICIPAL DE SILAO, GTO., A LOS HABITANTES DEL MISMO HAGO SABER: QUE EL H. AYUNTAMIENTO QUE PRESIDO CON FUNDAMENTO EN LOS ARTÍCULOS 115 FRACC. II DE LA CONSTITUCIÓN POLÍTICA DE LOS ESTADOS...»

«Quick Guide and Schematics Welcome to the Key West Family! Dear New Boat Owner, On behalf of every employee at Key West Boats, we are pleased to welcome you to the Key West Family! For over 25 years, Key West Boats has continuously set new standards in safety, construction, and design. Our skilled team, from our laminators and riggers to our sales and engineering department, are dedicated to every boat we build and we are constantly working to improve our product. Our dedication to each boat...»

«Ord Con Mins 2 April 2013 COUNCIL MINUTES 2 APRIL 2013 THESE MINUTES ARE HEREBY CERTIFIED AS CONFIRMED PRESIDING MEMBER’S SIGNATURE DATE: I:\CPS\ADMIN SERVICES\AGENDAS\MN130402.DOCX COUNCIL MINUTES 2 APRIL 2013 IND EX Item Description Page 131/13 PRAYER 1 132/13 DECLARATION OF OPENING 1 133/13 APOLOGIES 1 134/13 QUESTION TIME FOR THE PUBLIC 1 135/13 MEMBERS ON LEAVE OF ABSENCE AND APPLICATIONS FOR LEAVE OF ABSENCE 3 136/13 CONFIRMATION OF MINUTES 3 137/13 ANNOUNCEMENTS BY THE LORD MAYOR 3...»

«PORT HANDBOOK PORT OF MACKAY Port of Mackay Port Handbook Revised 2015 This document is a port directory describing the general characteristics and facilities at the Port of Mackay and is provided for information purposes only. Whilst reasonable efforts have been taken in preparation of this directory, no warranty is given as to its accuracy, reliability, currency or completeness (including the accuracy, reliability, currency or completeness of third party information). Contact details of...»

«Header for SPIE use Building a VR Narrative Josephine Anstey, Dave Pape, Dan Sandin Electronic Visualization Laboratory University of Illinois at Chicago ABSTRACT In this paper we discuss issues involved in creating art and cultural heritage projects in Virtual Reality with particular reference to one interactive narrative, “The Thing Growing”. In the first section we will briefly discuss the potential of VR as a medium for the production of art and the interpretation of culture. In the...»

«Event Electronics EZbus™ Midi Implementation Document Date: August 22, 2001 Firmware Version: 1.00 OVERVIEW This document is for software developers who want to take full advantage of the EZbus control surface and mix engine within their application. The communication protocol described here is conventional MIDI. Note that many of the EZbus system exclusive functions are also available through USB vendor-specific bulk I/O messages. Although USB bulk messages transmit fast, they require...»

«Mar 14, 2011 Chapter 2 The Deep Time of the Dead [We are] mortal creatures who miss our dead friends, and thus can appreciate levitating tigers and portraits by Raphael for what they are—songs of mortality sung by the prisoners of time”1 Vous nous voyez ci-attachés cinq, six Quant de la chair, que trop avons nourrie, Elle est pieça devoree et pourrie, Et nous les os, devenons cendre et pouldre.You see us cleaving together, five, six: As for the flesh, that we nourished too much, It is...»

«JUNE 14, 2016 ISSUE 59 SPONSORED BY THE PICARD GROUP By Jeremy Alford (JJA@LaPolitics.com/@LaPoliticsNow) _ Happy Tuesday, Trackers. I went from catching fish on Belle River this past weekend (PHOTO EVIDENCE: http://bit.ly/1ZMvy9O) to watching the Louisiana Legislature catch hell on Monday. Not one to beat around the bush, Rev and Fisc Chair J.P. Morrell announced publicly yesterday that he was holding the sales tax fix legislation hostage until the House sent over more tax boosters. Speaker...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.