WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |

«THE AESTHETICS OF SILENCE SUSAN SONTAG Aspen no. 5 + 6, item 3, 1967 I Every era has to reinvent the ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

THE AESTHETICS OF SILENCE

SUSAN SONTAG

Aspen no. 5 + 6, item 3, 1967

http://www.ubu.com/aspen/aspen5and6/index.html

I

Every era has to reinvent the project of "spirituality" for itself. (Spirituality = plans,

terminologies, ideas of deportment aimed at the resolution of painful structural

contradictions inherent in the human situation, at the completion of human consciousness, at transcendence.) In the modern era, one of the most active metaphors for the spiritual project is "art." The activities of the painter, the musician, the poet, the dancer et al, once they were grouped together under that generic name (a relatively recent move), have proved to be a peculiarly adaptable site on which to stage the formal dramas besetting consciousness, each individual work of art being a more or less astute paradigm for regulating or reconciling these contradictions. Of course, the site needs continual refurbishing.

Whatever goal is set for art eventually proves restrictive, matched against the widest goals of consciousness. Art, itself a form of mystification, endures a succession of crises of demystification; older artistic goals are assailed and, ostensibly, replaced; outgrown maps of consciousness are redrawn. But what supplies all these crises with their energy — an energy held in common, so to speak — is the very unification of numerous, quite disparate activities into a single genus. At the moment at which "art" comes into being, the modern period of art begins. From then forward, any of the activities therein subsumed becomes a profoundly problematic activity, each of whose procedures and, ultimately, whose very right to exist, can be called into question.

Following on the promotion of the arts into "art" comes the leading myth about art, that of the "absoluteness" of the artist's activity. In its first, more unreflective version, this myth considered art as an expression of human consciousness, consciousness seeking to

know itself. (The critical principles generated by this myth were fairly easily arrived at:

some expressions were more complete, more ennobling, more informative, richer than others.) The later version of the myth posits a more complex, tragic relation of art to consciousness. Denying that art is mere expression, the newer myth, ours, rather relates art to the mind's need or capacity for self-estrangement. Art is no longer understood as consciousness expressing and therefore, implicitly, affirming itself. Art is not consciousness per se, but rather its antidote — evolved from within consciousness itself.

(The critical principles generated by this myth were much harder to get at.) The newer myth, derived from a post-psychological conception of consciousness, installs within the activity of art many of the paradoxes involved in attaining an absolute state of being described by the great religious mystics. As the activity of the mystic must end in a via negative, a theology of God's absence, a craving for the cloud of unknowingness beyond knowledge and for the silence beyond speech, so art must tend toward anti-art, the elimination of the "subject" (the "object," the "image"), the substitution of chance for intention, and the pursuit of silence.

In the early, linear version of art's relation to consciousness, a struggle was held to exist between the "spiritual" integrity of the creative impulses and the distracting "materiality" of ordinary life, which throws up so many obstacles in the path of authentic sublimation.

But the newer version, in which art is part of a dialectical transaction with consciousness, poses a deeper, more frustrating conflict: The "spirit" seeking embodiment in art clashes with the "material" character of art itself. Art is unmasked as gratuitous, and the very concreteness of the artist's tools (and, particularly in the case of language, their historicity) appears as a trap. Practiced in a world furnished with second-hand perceptions, and specifically confounded by the treachery of words, the activity of the artist is cursed with mediacy. Art becomes the enemy of the artist, for it denies him the realization, the transcendence, he desires.

–  –  –

The scene changes to an empty room.

Rimbaud has gone to Abyssinia to make his fortune in the slave trade. Wittgenstein has first chosen schoolteaching, then menial work as a hospital orderly. Duchamp has turned to chess. And, accompanying these exemplary renunciations of a vocation, each man has declared that he considers his previous achievements in poetry. philosophy, or art as trifling, of no importance.

But the choice of permanent silence doesn't negate their work. On the contrary, it imparts retroactively an added power and authority to what was broken off; disavowal of the work becoming a new source of its validity, a certificate of unchallengeable seriousness.

That seriousness consists in not regarding art (or philosophy practiced as an art form:

Wittgenstein) as something whose seriousness lasts forever, an "end," a permanent vehicle for spiritual ambition. The truly serious attitude is one that regards art as a "means" to something that can perhaps be achieved only by abandoning art; judged more impatiently, art is a false way or (the word of the Dada artist Jacques Vaché) a stupidity.





Though no longer a confession, art is more than ever a deliverance, an exercise in asceticism. Through it, the artist becomes purified — of himself and, eventually, of his art, The artist (if not art itself) is still engaged in a progress toward "the good." But formerly, the artist's good was mastery of and fulfillment in his art. Now it's suggested that the highest good for the artist is to reach that point where those goals of excellence become insignificant to him, emotionally and ethically, and he is more satisfied by being silent than by finding a voice in art. Silence in this sense, as termination, proposes a mood of ultimacy antithetical to the mood informing the self-conscious artist's traditional serious use of silence: as a zone of meditation, preparation for spiritual ripening, an ordeal which ends in gaining the right to speak. (Cf. Valery, Rilke) So far as he is serious, the artist is continually tempted to sever the dialogue he has with an audience. Silence is the furthest extension of that reluctance to communicate, that ambivalence about making contact with the audience which is a leading motif of modern art, with its tireless commitment to the "new" and/or the "esoteric" Silence is the artist's ultimate other-worldly gesture; by silence, he frees himself from servile bondage to the world, which appears as patron, client, audience, antagonist, arbiter, and distorter of his work.

Still, in this renunciation of "society," one cannot fail to perceive a highly social gesture.

Some of the cues for the artist's eventual liberation from the need to practice his vocation come from observing his fellow artists and measuring himself against them. An exemplary decision of this sort can be made only after the artist has demonstrated that he possesses genius and exercised that genius authoritatively. Having already surpassed his peers, by the standards which he acknowledges, pride has only one place left to go. For, to be a victim of the craving for silence is to be, in still a further sense, superior to everyone else. It suggests that the artist has had the wit to ask more questions than other people, as well as that he possesses stronger nerves and higher standards of excellence.

(That the artist can persevere in the interrogation of his art until he or it is exhausted isn't in doubt. As René Char has written, "No bird has the heart to sing in a thicket of questions")

III

The exemplary modern artist's choice of silence isn't often carried to this point of final simplification, so that he becomes literally silent. More typically, he continues speaking, but in a manner that his audience can't hear. Most valuable art in our time has been experienced by audiences as a move into silence (or unintelligibility or invisibility or inaudibility); a dismantling of the artist's competence, his responsible sense of vocation — and therefore as an aggression against them.

Modern art's chronic habit of displeasing, provoking, or frustrating its audience can be regarded as a limited, vicarious participation in the ideal of silence which has been elevated as a prime standard of seriousness in the contemporary scene.

But it is also a contradictory form of participation in the ideal of silence. It's contradictory not only because the artist still continues making works of art, but also because the isolation of the work from its audience never lasts. With the passage of time and the intervention of newer, more difficult works, the artist's transgression becomes ingratiating, eventually legitimate. Goethe accused Kleist of having written his plays for an "invisible theatre." But in time the invisible theatre becomes "visible" The ugly and discordant and senseless become "beautiful." The history of art is a sequence of successful transgressions.

The characteristic aim of modern art, to be unacceptable to its audience, can be regarded as the inverse statement of the unacceptability to the artist of the very presence of an audience — in the familiar sense, an assembly of voyeuristic spectators. At least since Nietzsche observed in The Birth of Tragedy that an audience of spectators as we know it, those present whom the actors ignore, was unknown to the Greeks, a good deal of contemporary art seems moved by the desire to eliminate the audience from art, an enterprise that often presents itself as an attempt to eliminate "art" altogether. (In favor of "life"?) Committed to the idea that the power of art is located in its power to negate, the ultimate weapon in the artist's inconsistent war with his audience is to verge closer and closer to silence. The sensory or conceptual gap between the artist and his audience, the space of the missing or ruptured dialogue, can also constitute the grounds for an ascetic affirmation. Samuel Beckett speaks of "my dream of an art unresentful of its insuperable indigence and too proud for the farce of giving and receiving." But there is no abolishing a minimal transaction, a minimal exchange of gifts, just as there is no talented and rigorous asceticism that doesn't produce a gain (rather than a loss) in the capacity for pleasure.

And none of the aggressions committed intentionally or inadvertently by modern artists have succeeded in either abolishing the audience or transforming it into something else.

(A community engaged in a common activity?) They cannot. As long as art is understood and valued as an "absolute" activity, it will be a separate, elitist one. Elites presuppose masses. So far as the best art defines itself by essentially "priestly" aims, it presupposes and confirms the existence of a relatively passive, never fully initiated, voyeuristic laity which is regularly convoked to watch, listen, read, or hear — and then sent away.

The most that the artist can do is to play with the different terms in this situation vis-a-vis the audience and himself. To analyse the idea of silence is to analyse his various alternatives within this essentially unalterable situation.

–  –  –

How literally can the notion of silence be used with respect to art?

Silence exists as a decision — in the exemplary suicide of the artist (Kleist, Lautreamont), who thereby testifies that he has gone "too far"; and in such model renunciations by the artist of his vocation already cited.

Silence also exists as a punishment — self-punishment, in the exemplary madness of artists (Holderlin, Artaud) who demonstrate that one's very sanity may be the price of trespassing the accepted frontiers of consciousness; and, of course, in penalties (ranging from censorship and physical destruction of art-works to fines, exile, prison for the artist) meted out by "society" for the artist's spiritual nonconformity or for subversion of the group sensibility.

But silence can't exist in a literal sense as the experience of an audience. It would mean that the spectator was aware of no stimulus or that he was unable to make a response. But this can't happen or be induced programmatically. The non-awareness of any stimulus, the inability to make a response, can result only from a defective presentness on the part of the spectator, or a misunderstanding of his own reactions (misled by restrictive ideas about what would be a "relevant" response). But so far as any audience consists of sentient beings in a situation, there can be no such thing as having no response at all.

Nor can silence, in its literal state, exist as the property of an art work — even of works like Duchamp's readymades or Cage's 4'33", in which the artist has ostentatiously done no more to satisfy any established criteria of art than set the object in a gallery or situate the performance on a concert stage. There is no neutral surface, no neutral discourse, no neutral theme, no neutral form. Something is neutral only with respect to something else.

(An intention? An expectation?) As a property of the work of art itself, silence can exist only in a cooked or nonliteral sense. (Put otherwise: if a work exists at all, its silence is only one element in it.) Instead of raw or achieved silence, one finds various moves in the direction of an ever-receding horizon of silence — moves which, by definition, can't ever be fully consummated. One result is a type of art which many people characterize pejoratively as dumb, depressed, acquiescent, cold. But these privative qualities exist in a context of the artist's objective intention, which is always discernible. To cultivate the metaphoric silence that's suggested by conventionally lifeless subjects (as in much of Pop Art) and to construct "minimal" forms which seem to lack emotional resonance are in themselves vigorous, often tonic choices.

And, finally, even without imputing objective intentions to the art-work, there remains the inescapable truth about perception: the positivity of all experience at every moment of it. As John Cage has insisted, "there is no such thing as silence. Something is always happening that makes a sound." (Cage has described how, even in a soundless chamber, he still heard at least two things: his heartbeat and the coursing of the blood in his head).



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |


Similar works:

«1 What You Need to Know About Weight Loss Surgery Table of Contents 1-2 Welcome to My New Beginning 3 What is Obesity? 4-5 Bariatric Surgery Options 6-7 Your Obligations as a Bariatric Patient 8 Preparing for Your Bariatric Surgery 9 Checklist for My New Beginning Program 10-12 Shopping List Before Surgery 13 Good Habits to Develop Before Surgery 14 Herbal Supplements and Your Upcoming Surgery 15 Bariatric Post-Op Diet Progression 16 Discharge Home Instructions 17 Post-Op Emotions 18 Liquid...»

«The PipeLine Journal of the YDOA July Edition Patron: Dr Francis Jackson CBE (Organist Emeritus, York Minster) President: Nigel Holdsworth, 01904 640520 Secretary: Renate Sangwine, 01904 781387 Treasurer: Cynthia Wood, 01904 795204 Membership Secretary: Helen Roberts, 01904 708625 The PipeLine Editor, Webmaster and YDOA Archivist: Maximillian Elliott www.ydoa.co.uk The York & District Organists’ Association is affiliated to the Incorporated Association of Organists (IAO) and serves all who...»

«Sparrow—One Week in Heron City (Case B) | 1 New Perspectives in Policing SePtemBer 2009 National Institute of Justice One Week in Heron City (Case B) A Case Study Malcolm K. Sparrow, Ph.D. Introduction The Heron City case study is divided into three parts — Case A, Case B and Teaching Notes. The case study is designed to serve as a basis for discussions regarding: (a) the relationships among a range of current policing strategies, and (b) the nature of analytic support that modern...»

«MASARYK UNIVERSITY IN BRNO FACULTY OF EDUCATION DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARD IN TEACHING ENGLISH TO YOUNG LEARNERS MASTER THESIS BRNO 2009 Supervisor: Mgr. Naděžda Vojtková Written by: Bc. Jana Březinová 1 I declare that I wrote this thesis by myself and used only the literature listed. 2 I would like to express my thanks to Mrs Mgr Naděžda Vojtková for her helpful comments and encouragement. 3 Content Introduction 1. Theoretical part 1.1 Young...»

«CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MUSEUM OF PALEONTOLOGY T H E UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN December 31, 1981 VOL. 25, NO. 13, p. 259-275 (4 text-figs.) TAPHONOMIC INTERPRETATION OF ENAMEL-LESS TEETH IN THE SHOTGUN LOCAL FAUNA (PALEOCENE, WYOMING) BY DANIEL C. FISHER MUSEUM O F PALEONTOLOGY THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ANN ARBOR CONTRIBUTIONS FROM THE MUSEUM O F PALEONTOLOGY Philip D. Gingerich, Director Gerald R. Smith, Editor This series of contributions from the Museum of Paleontology is a medium for the...»

«Japan Ophthalmic Devices Market Outlook to 2018 Vision Care, Intraocular Lens (IOL), Cataract Surgery Devices, Ophthalmic Diagnostic Equipment, Refractive Surgery Devices, Vitreo Retinal Surgery Devices and Others Reference Code: GDME1198IDB Publication Date: January 2013 Japan Ophthalmic Devices Market Outlook to 2018 Vision Care, Intraocular Lens (IOL), Cataract Surgery Devices, Ophthalmic Diagnostic Equipment, Refractive Surgery Devices, Vitreo Retinal Surgery Devices and Others GDME1198IDB...»

«Dispensario Dr. Luis Aredez Libertador General San Martín – Jujuy ARGENTINA 1. Análisis de la situación Libertador General San Martín y la Provincia de Jujuy Libertador General San Martín es una localidad situada en la provincia de Jujuy en el Noroeste de Argentina. La provincia de Jujuy limita al norte con Bolivia, al oeste con Chile, y al sur y al este con la provincia de Salta. Desde el punto de vista ecológico, la mayor parte de su territorio se caracteriza por pertenecer a los...»

«La stigmatisation à l'égard du poids et ses conséquences sur la santé mentale des jeunes : un obstacle à l'adoption de saines habitudes de vie. Mémoire présenté dans le cadre de la consultation publique sur la lutte contre l’intimidation Par l’Association pour la santé publique du Québec (ASPQ) 30 novembre 2014 Table des matières Liste des sigles et des acronymes Présentation de l'Association pour la santé publique du Québec (ASPQ) Brève explication de l’intérêt pour le...»

«The Atlas of Analytical Signatures of Photographic Processes Dusan C. Stulik | Art Kaplan SILVER GELATIN © 2013 J. Paul Getty Trust. All rights reserved. The Getty Conservation Institute works internationally to advance conservation practice in the visual arts—broadly interpreted to include objects, collections, architecture, and sites. The GCI serves the conservation community through scientific research, education and training, model field projects, and the dissemination of the results of...»

«CURRICULUM VITAE Young Yun Kim, Ph.D. Department of Communication, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 Phone: 405/325-1587. Fax: 405/325-7625. E-mail: youngkim@ou.edu EDUCATION 1976 Ph. D., Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL. Dissertation: Communication patterns of foreign immigrants in the process of acculturation 1972 M.A., Speech Communication, University of Hawaii, Honolulu. In conjunction with East-West Communication Institute. Thesis: Comparative content analysis of...»

«The Piney Dark The Winners of the F i f t h A n n u a l S FA S U H o r r o r Wr i t i n g C o n t e s t 2 01 6  2 The Piney Dark T he Winners o f the Fi fth An nual SFASU Hor ror S hor t S tor y Con te st PRESENTED BY THE STEPHEN F. AUSTIN STATE UNIVERSITY ENGLISH AND CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT 2016 3 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS JUDGES: DR. STEVE MARSDEN is an Associate Professor of American Literature at SFA and an aficionado of ghosts, goblins, and short fiction. MICHAEL SHEEHAN is an...»

«Lancashire to Lahore William Titley 2010 A visual communication project between creative communities in the UK and Pakistan. Contents Introduction: William Titley 4 ‘Lancashire to Lahore’: Hayley Drayton 7 ‘This is Pakistan’ 8 Image Credits 9 Images: in alphabetical order 10 ‘This is England’ 26 Image Credits 27 Images: in alphabetical order 28 02 This page intentionally left blank 03 Introduction: William Titley In a world where forms of communication are developing in parallel...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.