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«IN 2000, 189 COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD CAME TOGETHER TO FACE THE FUTURE. And what they saw was daunting. Famines. Drought. Wars. Plagues. Poverty. The ...»

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IN 2000, 189 COUNTRIES OF THE WORLD CAME TOGETHER TO FACE THE FUTURE.

And what they saw was daunting. Famines. Drought. Wars. Plagues. Poverty.

The perennial problems of the world. Not just in some faraway place, but in

their own cities and towns and villages.

They knew things didn’t have to be this way. They knew we had enough food

to feed the world, but that it wasn’t getting shared. They knew there were

medicines for HIV and other diseases, but that they cost a lot. They knew that earthquakes and foods were inevitable, but that the high death tolls were not.

They also knew that billions of people worldwide shared their hope for a better future.

So leaders from these countries created a plan called the Millennium Develop- ment Goals (MDGs). This set of 8 goals imagined a future just 15 years of that would be rid of poverty and hunger. It was an ambitious plan.

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has been one of the leading organizations working to achieve the MDGs. Present in more than 170 countries and territories, we funded projects that helped fulfl the Goals.

We championed the Goals so that people everywhere would know how to do their part. And we acted as “scorekeeper,” helping countries track their progress.

And the progress in those 15 years has been tremendous. Hunger has been cut in half. Extreme poverty is down nearly by half. More kids are going to school and fewer are dying.

Now these countries want to build on the many successes of the past 15 years, and go further. The new set of goals, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), aims to end poverty and hunger by 2030. World leaders, recognizing the con- nection between people and planet, have set goals for the land, the oceans and the waterways. The world is also better connected now than it was in 2000, and is building a consensus about the future we want.

That future is one where everybody has enough food, and can work, and where living on less than $1.25 a day is a thing of the past.

UNDP is proud to continue as a leader in this global movement.

Introducing the new Sustainable Development Goals. What’s your Goal?

END POVERTY IN ALL ITS FORMS

EVERYWHERE

End extreme poverty in all forms by 2030. Yes, it’s an ambitious goal— but we believe it can be done. In 2000, the world committed to cutting the number of people living in extreme poverty by half in 15 years and we met this goal. However, more than 800 million people around the world still live on less than $1.25 a day—that’s about the equivalent of the entire population of Europe living in extreme poverty. Now it’s time to build on what we learned and end poverty altogether.

END HUNGER, ACHIEVE FOOD SECURITY

AND IMPROVED NUTRITION AND PROMOTE

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

In the past 20 years, hunger has dropped by almost half. Many coun- tries that used to sufer from famine and hunger can now meet the nutritional needs of their most vulnerable people. It’s an incredible accomplishment. Now we can go further and end hunger and malnutrition once and for all. That means doing things such as promoting sustainable agriculture and supporting small farmers. It’s a tall order.

But for the sake of the nearly 1 out of every 9 people on earth who go to bed hungry every night, we’ve got to try. Imagine a world where everyone has access to sufcient and nutritious food all year round.

Together, we can make that a reality by 2030.

ENSURE HEALTHY LIVES AND PROMOTE

WELL-BEING FOR ALL AT ALL AGES

We all know how important it is to be in good health. Our health afects everything from how much we enjoy life to what work we can perform. That’s why there’s a Goal to make sure everyone has health coverage and access to safe and efective medicines and vaccines.

Since 1990, we’ve made big strides—preventable child deaths are down by more than half, and maternal mortality is down by almost as much. And yet some other numbers remain tragically high, like the fact that every year 6 million children die before their ffth birthday, or that AIDS is the leading cause of death for adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. We have the means to turn that around and make good health more than just a wish.

ENSURE INCLUSIVE AND EQUITABLE

QUALITY EDUCATION AND PROMOTE LIFELONG LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

First, the bad news on education. Poverty, armed confict and other emergencies keep many, many kids around the world out of school.

In fact, in developing regions, kids from the poorest households are four times more likely to be out of school than those of the richest households. Now for some good news. Since 2000, there has been enormous progress on the goal to provide primary education to all children worldwide. The primary school enrolment rate in developing regions reached 91%. By measures in any school, that’s a good grade. Now, let’s get an even better grade for all kids and achieve the goal of universal primary and secondary education, afordable vocational training, access to higher education and more.





ACHIEVE GENDER EQUALITY AND

EMPOWER ALL WOMEN AND GIRLS

The great progress the world has made in becoming more prosperous and fair is worth celebrating. And yet, in just about every way, women and girls lag behind. There are still gross inequalities in work and wages, lots of unpaid “women’s work” such as child care and domestic work and discrimination in public decision-making. But there are grounds for hope. More girls are in school now compared to in 2000. Most regions have reached gender parity in primary education. The percentage of women getting paid for their work is on the rise. The Sustainable Development Goals aim to build on these achievements to ensure that there is an end to discrimination against women and girls everywhere. It’s a basic human right.

ENSURE AVAILABILITY AND SUSTAINABLE

MANAGEMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION

FOR ALL Everyone on earth should have access to safe and afordable drinking water. That’s the goal for 2030. While many people around the world take clean drinking water and sanitation for granted, many others don’t. Water scarcity afects more than 40 percent of people around the world, and that number is projected to go even higher as a result of climate change. If we continue the path we’re on, by 2050 at least one in four people are likely to be afected by recurring water shortages. But we can take a new path—more international cooperation, protecting wetlands and rivers, sharing water-treatment technologies and more—that leads to accomplishing this Goal.

ENSURE ACCESS TO AFFORDABLE,

RELIABLE, SUSTAINABLE AND MODERN

ENERGY FOR ALL

Between 1990 and 2010, the number of people with access to electricity increased by 1.7 billion. That’s progress to be proud of. And yet, as the world’s population continues to rise, still more people will need cheap energy to light their homes and streets, use phones and computers and do their everyday business. The way we get that energy is at issue; fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions are making drastic changes in the climate, leading to big problems on every continent.

Instead, we can become more energy-efcient and invest in clean energy sources such as solar and wind. That way we’ll meet electricity needs and protect the environment. How’s that for a balancing act?

PROMOTE SUSTAINED, INCLUSIVE AND

SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH, FULL

AND PRODUCTIVE EMPLOYMENT AND

DECENT WORK FOR ALL

An important part of economic growth is that people have jobs that pay enough to support themselves and their families. The good news is that the middle class is growing worldwide—almost tripling in size in developing countries in the last 25 years, to more than a third of the population. But in 2015, we also have widening inequalities, and job growth is not keeping pace with the growing labour force—over 200 million people don’t have jobs. That’s the equivalent of the entire population of Brazil. Things don’t have to be that way. We can promote policies that encourage entrepreneurship and job creation. We can eradicate forced labour, slavery and human trafcking. And in the end we can achieve the goal of decent work for all women and men by 2030.

BUILD RESILIENT INFRASTRUCTURE,

PROMOTE INCLUSIVE AND SUSTAINABLE

INDUSTRIALIZATION AND FOSTER

INNOVATION Technological progress helps us address big global challenges such as creating jobs and becoming more energy efcient. The world is becoming ever more interconnected and prosperous thanks to the internet. The more connected we are, the more we can all beneft from the wisdom and contributions of people everywhere on earth. And yet four billion people have no way of getting online, the vast majority of them in developing countries. The more we invest in innovation and infrastructure, the better of we’ll all be. Bridging the digital divide, promoting sustainable industries, and investing in scientifc research and innovation are all important ways to facilitate sustainable development.

REDUCE INEQUALITY WITHIN AND AMONG

COUNTRIES It’s an old story: the rich get richer, and the poor get poorer. The divide has never been starker. We can and must adopt policies that create opportunity for everyone, regardless of who they are or where they come from. Income inequality is a global problem that requires global solutions. That means improving the regulation of fnancial markets and institutions, sending development aid where it is most needed and helping people migrate safely so they can pursue opportunities.

We’ve made so much progress on poverty in the last 15 years, and now we can change the direction of the old story of inequality.

MAKE CITIES AND HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

INCLUSIVE, SAFE, RESILIENT AND

SUSTAINABLE

If you’re like most people, you live in a city. More than half the world’s population now lives in cities, and that fgure will go to about twothirds of humanity by the year 2050. Cities are getting bigger. In 1990 there were ten “mega-cities” with 10 million inhabitants or more. In 2014, there were 28 mega-cities, home to 453 million people. Incredible, huh? A lot of people love cities; they’re centers of culture and business and life. The thing is, they’re also often centers of extreme poverty. To make cities sustainable for all, we can create good, afordable public housing. We can upgrade slum settlements. We can invest in public transport, create green spaces and get a broader range of people involved in urban planning decisions. That way, we can keep the things we love about cities and change the things we don’t.

ENSURE SUSTAINABLE CONSUMPTION AND

PRODUCTION PATTERNS

Some people use a lot of stuf, and some people use very little—in fact, a big share of the world population is consuming too little to meet even their basic needs. It doesn’t have to be this way. We can have a world where everybody gets what they need to survive and thrive. And we can consume in a way that preserves our natural resources so that our children can enjoy them, and their children and their children after that. The hard part is how to achieve that goal. We can manage our natural resources more efciently and dispose of toxic waste better. Cut per capita food waste in half globally. Get businesses and consumers to reduce and recycle waste. And help countries that have typically not consumed a lot to move towards more responsible consumption patterns.

TAKE URGENT ACTION TO COMBAT CLIMATE

CHANGE AND ITS IMPACTS

Every country in the world is seeing the drastic efects of climate change, some more than others. On average, the annual losses just from earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical cyclones and fooding count in the hundreds of billions of dollars. We can reduce the loss of life and property by helping more vulnerable regions—such as land-locked countries and island states—become more resilient. The impact of global warming is getting worse. We’re seeing more storms, more droughts and more extremes than ever before. It is still possible, with political will and technological measures, to limit the increase in global mean temperature to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels—and thus avoid the worst efects of climate change. The Sustainable Development Goals lay out a way for countries to work together to meet this urgent challenge.

CONSERVE AND SUSTAINABLY USE THE

OCEANS, SEAS AND MARINE RESOURCES

FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

The oceans make human life possible. Their temperature, their chemistry, their currents, their life forms. For one thing, more than 3 billion people depend on marine and coastal diversity for their livelihoods. But today we are seeing nearly a third of the world’s fsh stocks overexploited. That’s not a sustainable way of life. Even people who live nowhere near the ocean can’t live without it. Oceans absorb about 30 percent of the carbon dioxide that humans produce; but we’re producing more carbon dioxide than ever before and that makes the oceans more acidic—26% more, since the start of the industrial revolution. Our trash doesn’t help either—13,000 pieces of plastic litter on every square kilometer of ocean. Sounds bad, right? Don’t despair! The Sustainable Development Goals indicate targets for managing and protecting life below water.

PROTECT, RESTORE AND PROMOTE

SUSTAINABLE USE OF TERRESTRIAL

ECOSYSTEMS, SUSTAINABLY MANAGE

FORESTS, COMBAT DESERTIFICATION, AND



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