WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 |

«On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ William D. Edwards, MD; Wesley J. Gabel, MDiv; Floyd E. Hosmer, MS, AMI Jesus of Nazareth underwent Jewish and ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

On the Physical Death of Jesus Christ

William D. Edwards, MD; Wesley J. Gabel, MDiv; Floyd E. Hosmer, MS, AMI

Jesus of Nazareth underwent Jewish and Roman trials was flogged and was sentenced to death by

crucifixion. The scourging produced deep stripelike lacerations and appreciable blood loss and it

probably set the stage for hypovolemic shock as evidenced by the fact that Jesus was too weakened

to carry the crossbar (patibulum) to Golgotha. At the site of crucifixion his wrists were nailed to the patibulum and after the patibulum was lifted onto the upright post (stipes) his feet were nailed to the stipes. The major pathophysiologic effect of crucifixion was an interference with normal respirations.

Accordingly death resulted primarily from hypovolemic shock and exhaustion asphyxia. Jesus death was ensured by the thrust of a soldier s spear into his side. Modern medical interpretation of the historical evidence indicates that Jesus was dead when taken down from the cross.

(JAMA 1986; 255:1455-1463) For additional information see the website on the internet at www.kgnet.com/jesus/ __________________________________________________________________________________

THE LIFE and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth have formed the basis for a major world religion (Christianity), have appreciably influenced the course of human history, and, by virtue of a compassionate attitude toward the sick, also have contributed to the development of modern medicine.

The eminence of Jesus as a historical figure and the suffering and controversy associated with his death have stimulated us to investigate, in an interdisciplinary manner, the circumstances surrounding his crucifixion. Accordingly, it is our intent to present not a theological treatise but rather a medically and historically accurate account of the physical death of the one called Jesus Christ.

SOURCES

The source Material concerning Christ's death comprises a body of literature and not a physical body or its skeletal remains.

Accordingly, the credibility of any discussion of Jesus' death will be determined primarily by the credibility of one's sources. For this review, the source material includes the writings of ancient Christian and non-Christian authors, the writings of modern authors, and the Shroud of Turin.1 Using the legal-historical method of scientific investigation,27 scholars have established the reliability and accuracy of the ancient manuscripts.26,27,29,31 The most extensive and detailed descriptions of the life and death of Jesus are to be found in the New Testament gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John.1 The other 23 books of the New Testament support but do not expand on the details recorded in the gospels. Contemporary Christian, Jewish, and Roman authors provide additional insight concerning the first-century Jewish and Roman legal systems and the details of scourging and crucifixion.5 Seneca, Livy, Plutarch, and others refer to crucifixion practices in their works.8,28 Specifically, Jesus (or his crucifixion) is mentioned by the Roman historians Cornelius Tacitus, Pliny the Younger, and Suetonius, by non-Roman historians Thallus and Phlegon, by the satirist Lucian of Samosata, by the Jewish Talmud, and by the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, although the authenticity of portions of the latter is problematic.26 The Shroud of Turin is considered by many to represent the actual burial cloth of Jesus,22 and several publications concerning the medical aspects of his death draw conclusions from this assumption.5, 11 The Shroud of Turin and recent archaeological findings provide valuable information concerning Roman crucifixion practices.22-24 The interpretations of modern writers, based on a knowledge of science and medicine not available in the first century, may offer additional insight concerning the possible mechanisms of Jesus' death.2-17 When taken in concert certain facts -- the extensive and early testimony of both Christian proponents and opponents, and their universal acceptance of Jesus as a true historical figure; the ethic of the gospel writers, and the shortness of the time interval between the events and the extant manuscripts; and the confirmation of the gospel accounts by historians and archaeological findings 26-27 -- ensure a reliable testimony from which a modern medical interpretation of Jesus' death may be made.

GETHSEMANE After Jesus and his disciples had observed the Passover meal in an upper room in a home in southwest Jerusalem, they traveled to the Mount of Olives, northeast of the city (Fig 1). (Owing to various adjustments in the calendar, the years of Jesus' birth and death remain controversial.29 However, it is likely that Jesus was born in either 4 or 6 BC and died in 30 AD.11, 29 During the Passover observance in 30 AD, the Last Supper would have been observed on Thursday, Fig 1.Map of Jerusalem at time of Christ.

Jesus left Upper Room and walked with disciples to Mount of Olives and Garden of Gethsemane (1), where he was arrested and taken first to Annas and then to Caiaphas (2). After first trial before political Sanhedrin at Caiaphas' residence, Jesus was tried again before religious Sanhedrin, probably at Temple (3) Next, he was taken to Pontius Pilate (4), who sent him to Herod Antipas (5). Herod returned Jesus to Pilate (6), and Pilate finally handed over Jesus for scourging at Fortress of Antonia and for crucifixion at Golgotha (7). (Modified from Pfeiffer et al.30) April 6 [Nisan 13], and Jesus would have been crucified on Friday, April 7 [Nisan 14].29) At nearby Gethsemane, Jesus, apparently knowing that the time of his death was near, suffered great mental anguish, and, as described by the physician Luke, his sweat became like blood.' Although this is a very rare phenomenon, bloody sweat (hematidrosis or hemohidrosis) may occur in highly emotional states or in persons with bleeding disorders.18-20 As a result of hemorrhage into the sweat glands, the skin becomes fragile and tender. 2, 11 Luke's description supports the diagnosis of hematidrosis rather than eccrine chromidrosis (brown or yellow-green sweat) or stigmatization (blood oozing from the palms or elsewhere).18-21 Although some authors have suggested that hematidrosis produced hypovolemia, we agree with Bucklin 5 that Jesus' actual blood loss probably was minimal. However, in the cold night air, 1 it may have produced chills.





TRIALS Jewish Trials Soon after midnight, Jesus was arrested at Gethsemane by the temple officials and was taken first to Annas and then to Caiaphas, the Jewish high priest for that year (Fig 1). 1 Between 1 AM and daybreak, Jesus was tried before Caiaphas and the political Sanhedrin and was found guilty of blasphemy. 1 The guards then blindfolded Jesus, spat on him, and struck him in the face with their fists. Soon after daybreak, presumably at the temple (Fig l), Jesus was tried before the religious Sanhedrin (with the Pharisees and the Sadducees) and again was found guilty of blasphemy, a crime punishable by death.1, 5

Roman Trials

Since permission for an execution had to come from the governing Romans, 1 Jesus was taken early in the morning by the temple officials to the Praetorium of the Fortress of Antonia, the residence and governmental seat of Pontius Pilate, the procurator of Judea (Fig 1). However, Jesus was presented to Pilate not as a blasphemer but rather as a self-appointed king who would undermine the Roman authority. 1 Pilate made no charges against Jesus and sent him to Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Judea. 1 Herod likewise made no official charges and then returned Jesus to Pilate (Fig 1). 1 Again, Pilate could find no basis for a legal charge against Jesus, but the people persistently demanded crucifixions Pilate finally granted their demand and handed over Jesus to be flogged (scourged) and crucified. (MeDowell 25 has reviewed the prevailing political, religious, and economic climates in Jerusalem at the time of Jesus' death, and Bucklin 5 has described the various illegalities of the Jewish and Roman trials.)

Health of Jesus

The rigors of Jesus' ministry (that is, traveling by foot throughout Palestine) would have precluded any major physical illness or a weak general constitution. Accordingly, it is reasonable to assume that Jesus was in good physical condition before his walk to Gethsemane. However, during the 12 hours between 9 PM Thursday and 9 AM Friday, he had suffered great emotional stress (as evidenced by hematidrosis), abandonment by his closest friends (the disciples), and a physical beating (after the first Jewish trial). Also, in the setting of a traumatic and sleepless night, he had been forced to walk more than 2.5 miles (4.0 km) to and from the sites of the various trials (Fig 1). These physical and emotional factors may have rendered Jesus particularly vulnerable to the adverse hemodynamic effects of the scourging.

Fig 2.Scourging. Left, Short whip (flagrum) with lead balls and sheep bones tied into leather thongs.

Center left, Naked victim tied to flogging post. Deep stripelike lacerations were usually associated with considerable blood IOS6 Center right, View from above, showing position of lictors. Right, Inferomedial direction of wounds.

SCOURGING Scourging Practices Flogging was a legal preliminary to every Roman execution, 28 and only women and Roman senators or soldiers (except in eases of desertion) were exempt.11 The usual instrument was a short whip (flagellum or flagellum) with several single or braided leather thongs of variable lengths, in which small iron balls or sharp pieces of sheep bones were tied at intervals (Fig 2).5, 7, 11 Occasionally, staves also were used. 8, 12 For scourging, the man was stripped of his clothing, and his hands were tied to an upright post (Fig 2). 11 The back, buttocks, and legs were flogged either by two soldiers (lictors) or by one who alternated positions.5, 7, 11, 28 The severity of the scourging depended on the disposition of the lictors and was intended to weaken the victim to a state just short of collapse or death. 8 After the scourging, the soldiers often taunted their victim.11

Medical Aspects of Scourging

As the Roman soldiers repeatedly struck the victim's back with full force, the iron balls would cause deep contusions, and the leather thongs and sheep bones would cut into the skin and Subcutaneous tissues.7 Then, as the flogging continued, the lacerations would tear into the underlying skeletal muscles and produce quivering ribbons of bleeding flesh.2, 7, 25 Pain and blood loss generally set the stage for circulatory shock.12 The extent of blood loss may well have determined how long the victim would survive on the cross.8

Scourging of Jesus

At the Praetorium, Jesus was severely whipped. (Although the severity of the scourging is not discussed in the four gospel accounts, it is implied in one of the epistles [1 Peter 2:24]. A detailed word study of the ancient Greek text for this verse indicates that the scourging of Jesus was particularly harsh.33) It is not known whether the number of lashes was limited to 39, in accordance with Jewish law.5 The Roman soldiers, amused that this weakened man had claimed to be a king, began to mock him by placing a robe on his shoulders, a crown of thorns on his head, and a wooden staff as a scepter in his right hand.1 Next, they spat on Jesus and struck him on the head with the wooden staff.1 Moreover, when the soldiers tore the robe from Jesus' back, they probably reopened the scourging wounds.7 The severe scourging, with its intense pain and appreciable blood loss, most probably left Jesus in a pre-shock state.

Moreover, hematidrosis had rendered his skin particularly tender. The physical and mental abuse meted out by the Jews and the Romans, as well as the lack of food, water, and sleep, also contributed to his generally weakened state. Therefore, even before the actual crucifixion, Jesus' physical condition was at least serious and possibly critical.

Fig 3.Cross and titulus. Left, victim carrying crossbar (patibulum) to site of upright post (stipes). center Low Tau cross (crux commissa), commonly used by Romans at time of Christ. upper right, Rendition of Jesus' titulus with name and crime Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews written in Hebrew, Latin, and Greek. Lower right Possible methods for attaching tittles to Tau cross (left) and Latin cross (right).

Variations in Crosses Used for Crucifixion

–  –  –

CRUCIFIXION

Crucifixion Practices Crucifixion probably first began among the Persians.34 Alexander the Great introduced the practice to Egypt and Carthage, and the Romans appear to have learned of it from the Carthaginians.11 Although the Romans did not invent crucifixions they perfected it as a form of torture and capital punishment that was designed to produce a slow death with maximum pain and suffering.10, 17 It was one of the most disgraceful and cruel methods of execution and usually was reserved only for slaves, foreigners, revolutionaries, and the vilest of criminals.3, 25, 28 Roman law usually protected Roman citizens from crucifixion, 5 except perhaps in the ease of desertion by soldiers.In its earliest form in Persia, the victim was either tied to a tree or was tied to or impaled on an upright post, usually to keep the guilty victim's feet from touching holy ground. 8, 11, 30, 34, 38 Only later was a true cross used; it was characterized by an upright post (stipes) and a horizontal crossbar (patibulum), and it had several variations (Table).11 Although archaeological and historical evidence strongly indicates that the low Tau cross was preferred by the Romans in Palestine at the time of Christ (Fig 3),2, 7, 11 crucifixion practices often varied in a given geographic region and in accordance with the imagination of the executioners, and the Latin cross and other forms also may have been used.28 Fig 4.Nailing of wrists. Left, Size of iron nail. Center, Location of nail in wrist, between carpals and radius. Right, Cross section of wrist, at level of plane indicated at left, showing path of nail, with probable transection of median nerve and impalement of flexor pollicis longus, but without injury to major arterial trunks and without fractures of bones.



Pages:   || 2 | 3 |


Similar works:

«YOUR TERMS AND CONDITIONS CONTENTS 1. THINGS TO KNOW AT THE START OF YOUR MEMBERSHIP 2 1.1 What types of memberships do we have?1.2 Do we offer any discounts?1.3 How old do you have to be?1.4 When does your agreement start?1.5 Can you change your mind? 1.6 What about your health? 2. THINGS TO KNOW DURING YOUR MEMBERSHIP 6 2.1 When do you pay membership fees? 2.2 How do direct debits work? 2.3 What happens if your payment is late or fails? 2.4 Can we change your agreement? 2.5 Can we increase...»

«IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences (IOSR-JDMS) e-ISSN: 2279-0853, p-ISSN: 2279-0861.Volume 15, Issue 1 Ver. I (Jan. 2016), PP 134-138 www.iosrjournals.org Oral Cavity Cancers –Early Detection and Outcomes Nirupama Moran1, Debajit Sarma2, 1 Post Graduate Student, Department Of Otorhinolaryngology And Head Neck Surgery, Assam Medical College And Hospital, Dibrugarh, India. 2 Registrar, Department Of Otorhinolaryngology And Head Neck Surgery, Assam Medical College And Hospital,...»

«Pink Himalayan Salt Top 14 Healing Secrets 1. Fights Diabetes & Normalizes Blood Sugar One of the most vital and crucial benchmark of our body health is our blood sugar level. Having too low or too high a blood sugar has its corresponding disadvantages and if the problem becomes extreme it can be very hard on our body. Chronic high blood sugar can result in developing a disease called diabetes. However, for people who are already diabetic, ample intake of Himalayan salt will put the body into...»

«APPENDIX D PBL questions and answers Fluids, Electrolytes and Acid/Base Balance PROBLEM 1 Severe Hypochloremic, Hypokalemic Metabolic Alkalosis with Intravascular Volume Deficit A 45 year old man with previously known duodenal ulcer disease presents with complaints of persistent vomiting for the past 36 hours. The vomit is clear-looking and acidic in taste. He has no abdominal pain. Prior to the vomiting, he had difficulty with solid foods causing fullness in the stomach and he had been taking...»

«INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EYE HEALTH Prevention of Childhood Blindness Teaching Set © 1998, updated 2007, International Centre for Eye Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK. Web sites: www.iceh.org.uk and www.jceh.co.uk. Supported by CBM International, HelpAge International, Sight Savers International, Task Force Sight and Life. Table of Contents 1. Childhood Blindness Worldwide 2 2. Causes of Childhood Blindness 3 3. Onset of Blindness 4 4....»

«DIABETIC RETINOPATHY for the Comprehensive Ophthalmologist SECOND EDITION Raj K. Maturi, M.D. Jonathan D. Walker, M.D. Robert B. Chambers, D.O., FAOCOO Diabetic Retinopathy for the Comprehensive Ophthalmologist SECOND EDITION Raj K. Maturi, M.D. Associate Clinical Professor Department of Ophthalmology Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis Retina Service, Midwest Eye Institute Jonathan D. Walker, M.D. Clinical Assistant Professor Indiana University School of Medicine Fort Wayne...»

«Living Life to the Fullest: Families Share their Ideas A resource of strategies for caring for an individual with Huntington’s Created for families by families Living Life to the Fullest: Families Share their Ideas A resource of strategies for caring for an individual with Huntington’s Created for families by families Please be advised that each person with HD is unique, with different and changing needs. Before using any of the suggestions contained in this booklet please consult your...»

«SEXUAL OFFENDER TREATMENT: A PARADIGM ANALYSIS OF ACADEMIC JOURNALS by VIJAY F. CHILLAR A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Honors in the Major Program in Criminal Justice in the College of Health and Public Affairs and in The Burnett Honors College at the University of Central Florida Orlando, Florida Spring Term 2014 Thesis Chair: Dr. Roberto Potter ABSTRACT Many criminologists and psychologists have theorized the possible causes behind an individual who...»

«THE HERO EMPLOYEE HEALTH MANAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES SCORECARD IN COLLABORATION WITH MERCER© Version 4 An editable PDF of the questionnaire to help you prepare to complete the Scorecard online 2 INTRODUCTION ABOUT THIS PDF Welcome to the latest version of the HERO Employee Health Management (EHM) Best Practices Scorecard in This PDF of the Scorecard is provided for informational collaboration with Mercer (“Scorecard”). The Scorecard purposes only. This form may be useful in gathering is...»

«Package leaflet: Information for the user TREVICTA 175 mg prolonged release suspension for injection TREVICTA 263 mg prolonged release suspension for injection TREVICTA 350 mg prolonged release suspension for injection TREVICTA 525 mg prolonged release suspension for injection Paliperidone Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start using this medicine because it contains important information for you.Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again.If you have any further questions,...»

«SELF-REGULATION FROM BIRTH TO AGE SEVEN: ASSOCIATIONS WITH MATERNAL MENTAL HEALTH, PARENTING, AND SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL AND BEHAVIOURAL OUTCOMES FOR CHILDREN Kate Elizabeth Williams RMT BMus PGDipMusThy MEd(Research) Supervisors: Professor Donna Berthelsen Associate Professor Sue Walker Professor Jan M. Nicholson This thesis is submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) School of Early Childhood Faculty of Education Queensland University of Technology ABSTRACT This research is focussed...»

«ANNEX I SUMMARY OF PRODUCT CHARACTERISTICS 1 1. NAME OF THE MEDICINAL PRODUCT Irbesartan/Hydrochlorothiazide Teva 150 mg/12.5 mg film-coated tablets 2. QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE COMPOSITION Each film-coated tablet contains 150 mg of irbesartan and 12.5 mg of hydrochlorothiazide. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 3. PHARMACEUTICAL FORM Film-coated tablet. Light pink to pink, film-coated capsule shaped tablet. One side of the tablet debossed with the number 93. The other side...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.