WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 11 |

«by EMILY JANE ROTHWELL A thesis submitted to the Department of Art in conformity with the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Queen’s ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

THE STRENGTH OF A KNITTED HOME

Retrieving Histories Through Janet Morton’s Wool Installations

by

EMILY JANE ROTHWELL

A thesis submitted to the Department of Art

in conformity with the requirements for

the degree of Master of Arts

Queen’s University

Kingston, Ontario, Canada

July, 2007

Copyright © Emily Rothwell, 2007

ii

For my parents, Brenda Stanton Rothwell and Paul Rothwell,

and my sister, Janet Rothwell And for my grandmother, Veleda Ladouceur Stanton Amm, a single mother of four children, whose brave and creative life choices inspired this thesis iii The places of everyday urban life are, by their nature, mundane, ordinary, and constantly reused, and their social and political meanings are often not obvious.

Dolores Hayden1 1 Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Public History (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1997) 227.

iv Abstract This thesis focuses on the ways in which Janet Morton’s installations explore geographic and architectural spatial arrangements, and the ways in which these arrangements reproduce hierarchies of gender, race, and class. As cultural geographers and architectural historians have argued, and as I argue in the context of Morton’s work, architecture and geography exist in a reciprocal relationship with the social context in which they exist. Consequently, social histories that amass in politicized spaces referred to as “home,” such as gendered suburban houses, urban shelters, segregated neighbourhoods, are often marginalized. By discussing the way Morton’s work alludes to marginalized social and spatial histories within home environments, I demonstrate the ways that mainstream understanding of the subordination of marginalized groups is informed by sociospatial histories.

I explore these issues in the context of three of Morton’s installations. I first discuss Morton’s installation, Cozy, a work that consisted of sweaters stitched together to form a knitted cozy, which was then installed in 1999 under the auspices of the Textile Museum of Canada around a house on Ward’s Island near Toronto. I argue that Morton offered a point of entry to discuss marginalized histories of Anglo-Canadian, middle-class women’s cultural production in Canada. The second installation I discuss is Domestic Interior, a knitted living-room setting that recalled 1950s-60s domesticity --installed as part of the larger exhibition, “wool work,” at the Textile Museum of Canada in 2000. I posit that Morton’s installation could be seen as a point of entry into an exploration of marginalized urban histories of post-war suburban Toronto. I examine another installation of Cozy, a work in which Morton used the knitted sheath from her earlier

–  –  –

Toronto. I argue that the archetypal house-shape of this Cozy can be seen to critique the way all levels of government have ignored the crisis homeless individuals face in Toronto. Lastly, I argue that Morton can be seen as working within museums with “reformist purposes” as a means of negotiating her own role as an artist working within

–  –  –

I am deeply grateful to both of my thesis supervisors, Dr. Lynda Jessup and Dr.

Susan Lord. I would like to thank Lynda Jessup for her steadfast and insightful editorial guidance. Lynda Jessup is a rare academic who is equally gifted as a scholar, writer, editor, and teacher. She leads her students by walking behind them. I would also like to thank Susan Lord whose directed reading course provided me with vigorous, creative discussions, as well as theoretical foundations from which to write. Susan Lord imparted vital scholarly leadership and significant editorial direction.

I wish to thank especially the artist, Janet Morton, for her offering her time, pithy philosophies, kindness, and humour to a searching student.

I want to thank Sarah Holland, Sarah Quinton, Robert Windrum, and Melanie Townsend who curated and organized Janet Morton’s installations at the Textile Museum of Canada, Gallery Stratford, and Museum London, for their generosity of time and candor.

I am indebted to the warm and dedicated administrative staff of the Queen’s University Art Department, Louise Segsworth, Darlene Daniels, and Diane Platt. I would also like to thank the library sciences staff of both Carleton University and Queen’s University for their efficiency.

A graduate student needs good professors and I would like to thank the faculty of the Department of Art at Queen’s University who both inspired and challenged me beyond the confines of the classroom, Dr. Clive Robertson, Dr. Janice Helland, and the

–  –  –

I would also like to thank Dr. Caroline Stevens and Dr. Cynthia Hammond, who were mentors to me during my undergraduate education at Carleton University.

I would like to thank my close friends and extended family for their love and support. They know who they are.

I wish to thank the new friends I met at Queen’s, and around town, who filled my experience in Kingston with good times. I thank Nital Jethalal, Erin Morton, Kristy Holmes, Andrea Terry, Ann Marie Piekenbrock, Ashley Vanstone, Tim Johnston, Chris Trimmer, and, in particular, Penny Robertson, and Andrea Javor. I would like to thank especially Julian Ball whose love, humour, music, and friendship provided partnership during an exhilarating time.





Finally, I would like to thank my family for their unconditional love and support. I thank my father, Paul Rothwell, and my mother, Brenda Stanton Rothwell, two special parents who believe in both formal and informal education, and in following one’s heart.

–  –  –

Abstract……………………………………………………………………………..iv-v Acknowledgements………………………………………………………………..vi-vii List of Illustrations……………………………………………………………………ix Chapter One: introduction………………………………………………..…………....1 Chapter Two Cozy at Ward’s Island: patchwork histories………………………….....4 Chapter Three Domestic Interior: working at home………………………………… 20 Chapter Four Cozy at Trinity Square Park: where home resides……………..……....44 Chapter Five: working within the cultural institution…………………..…………….71 Chapter Six: epilogue………………………………………………………………....77

–  –  –

Figure 1. Janet Morton, Cozy, 1999; wool, Ward’s Island installation…………….

.........5 Figure 2. Sean Tamblyn’s Ward’s Island house prior to installation, 1999……………...6 Figure 3. Janet Morton, Cozy (Detail), 1999; wool, Ward’s Island installation………….7 Figure 4. Janet Morton, Domestic Interior, 2000; wool, found furniture, Textile Museum of Canada installation……………………………………………………………………21 Figure 5. Janet Morton, Domestic Interior (Detail), 2000; wool, found furniture, Textile Museum of Canada installation………………………………………………………….27 Figure 6. Meret Oppenheim, Object, 1936; fur-covered cup, saucer, and spoon, Museum of Modern Art……………………………………………………………………………28 Figure 7. Janet Morton, Domestic Interior (Detail), 2000; wool, found furniture, Textile Museum of Canada installation………………………………………………………….32 Figure 8. Janet Morton, Cozy, 2000; wool, metal scaffold, Trinity Square Park installation………………………………………………………………………………..45 Figure 9. Janet Morton, Cozy, 2000; wool, metal scaffold, Trinity Square Park installation………………………………………………………………………………..59

–  –  –

Chapter One: introduction This thesis focuses on the ways in which Janet Morton’s installations explore geographic and architectural spatial arrangements, and the ways in which these arrangements reproduce hierarchies of gender, race, and class. As cultural geographers and architectural historians have argued, and as I argue in the context of Morton’s work, architecture and geography exist in a reciprocal relationship with the social context in which they exist. Consequently, social histories that amass in politicized spaces referred to as “home,” such as gendered suburban houses, urban shelters, and segregated neighbourhoods are often marginalized. By discussing the way Morton’s work alludes to marginalized social and spatial histories within home environments, I demonstrate the ways that mainstream understanding of the subordination of marginalized groups is informed by sociospatial histories. Better understanding of such histories, I would argue, leads to increased awareness of the ways in which, for subordinated groups, staking a claim towards self-determination was, and continues to be, an everyday struggle.

I explore these issues in the context of three of Morton’s installations. These installations offer viewers a means of understanding the histories of those who have been denied equal access to modes of production based on not only societal marginalization, but also spatial factors, such as geographical and architectural segregation. I first discuss Morton’s installation, Cozy, a work that consisted of eight hundred recycled sweaters stitched together to form a knitted cozy, which was then installed in 1999 under the auspices of the Textile Museum of Canada around a house on Ward’s Island near Toronto. Drawing from Cozy’s visual cues, as well as on feminist art history scholarship, I argue that Morton offered a means to discuss marginalized histories of Anglo-Canadian,

–  –  –

production of craft both in the informality of the home and, since the early-twentieth century, for such formal associations as the Canadian Handicrafts Guild. Accessing these histories, in turn, provides a possible point of entry into discussion of the colonizing relationship Anglo-Canadian women artists of the Canadian Handicrafts Guild had with Aboriginal artists who were also working with the Guild early in the century.

The second installation I discuss is Domestic Interior, a living-room setting that recalled a specific model of 1950s-60s domesticity. Installed as part of the larger exhibition, “wool work,” at the Textile Museum of Canada in 2000, it consisted of a seemingly ordinary domestic space in which all the objects were encased in knitted sheaths. I focus on the ways in which Morton’s installation could be seen as an exploration of marginalized urban histories of suburbia, in this instance, the suburban regions of mid-twentieth century Toronto. I discuss briefly the diverse industrial suburbs that were made up of working-class individuals throughout the twentieth century and the hidden labour that also occurred inside homes, rather than in those conventional geographic locations labeled as workplaces. In turn, I complicate this perhaps morefamiliar feminist discussion of erased labour in suburbia by drawing from recently published histories of live-in domestic workers, who often worked for Anglo-Canadian middle-class women and yet were segregated from suburban communities based on differences in race and religion. Drawing from Domestic Interior’s visual cues and on the work of anti-racism scholars, I discuss the installation in terms of these histories in order to complicate the more common feminist interpretation of Morton’s work. By drawing on anti-racism feminist discourse, I seek to demonstrate the ways in which Morton attempted to use Domestic Interior to address audiences and allude to more histories than have been

–  –  –

I examine another installation of Cozy, a work of 2000 in which Morton used the knitted sheath from her earlier Ward’s Island Cozy to cover a metal scaffolding in Trinity Square Park in downtown Toronto. Morton selected the park deliberately because a homeless population lived there, occupying what has been traditionally regarded as public space. I argue that the archetypal house-shape of this Cozy can be seen to quietly critique the way municipal, provincial, and federal levels of government have ignored the crisis homeless individuals face, specifically, in Toronto. I draw on the work of policy scholars and social historians to discuss the history of homelessness in Canada from the 1970s onward. In doing so, I hope to demonstrate the ways in which Cozy contributed to discussions that question both the rise of poverty in Canada in a globalized capitalist era and the exile of the homeless from public spaces, such as parks in municipal Toronto.

Lastly, I argue that Morton, a successful mid-career artist, can be seen as working within museums with “reformist purposes” (to use Tom O’Regan’s phrase) as a means of negotiating her own role as an artist working within hegemonic institutional structures.2 In other words, I argue, she works within authoritative institutions as a strategy to garner funding and personal security while subtly critiquing dominant groups and encouraging others to continue such critiques through various means in their everyday lives. Although Morton’s installations have not been considered protest art, because of resistance to her works and their implicit critiques of institutional authority they have required her to negotiate her position within the museums in which she has worked. Using her collaboration with the Textile Museum of Canada as an example, I trace Morton’s

–  –  –

and use the space of an institution, and yet avoid being fully complicit in the institution’s mission. In Morton’s work, this is achieved through the artist’s subtle critiques of the dominant group power the museum space reinforces.



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 11 |


Similar works:

«1 Once the American Dream I n his book The Epic of America, historian James Truslow Adams first coins the term “the American Dream.” He states, “[The American Dream is] that dream of a land in which life should be better and richer and fuller for everyone, with opportunity for each according to ability or achievement.... It is... a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be...»

«ORAL HISTORY INTERVIEW with Mr. Wirt Mineau at his home St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin September 30, 1955 by Helen McCann White ©Forest History Society Durham, North Carolina Original publisher’s notice: All publication rights to the contents of this oral history interview are held by the Forest History Foundation, Inc., 2706 West Seventh Boulevard, St. Paul, Minnesota. Permission to publish any part of this oral history interview must be obtained in writing from the Forest History Foundation,...»

«Louisiana Architecture: 1945-1965 Post-War Subdivisions and the Ranch House HISTORICAL BACKGROUND Post-WWII Population Growth and U.S. Housing Shortage: Without a doubt no American industry was harder hit by the Great Depression and the Second World War than housing. Over this protracted sixteen year period, annual housing starts fell to less than 10% of what they had been during the boom days of the “Roaring Twenties.” Numerous architectural practices and construction firms simply “went...»

«Developmental Prayer November 2014 Developmental Prayer November 2014 Introduction Prayer is a form of expression which has a long and complex history. The language of prayer (and prayers) and the ways in which prayer plays a part in worship and personal devotion have varied and developed according to era and context across a wide span of time. This language and role of prayer is something which we grow into through praying for ourselves, sharing our prayers and using the prayers of others in...»

«CENTRE FOR ARCHITECTURE I THEORY I CRITICISM I HISTORY ATCH Author(s) Wilson, Andrew and Reilly, Angela Title ‘Reflections on an enduring partnership’ Date 2005 Wilson, Andrew (Ed.), Hayes & Scott: post-war houses, St Lucia, Queensland: Source The University of Queensland Press, pp. 2-17. ISBN 9780702235061; 0702235067 www.uq.edu.au/atch HAYES & SCOTT: POST-WAR HOUSES Reflections on an enduring partnership Andrew Wilson and Angela Reilly 2 Falls House, Hamilton, by Chambers and Ford...»

«Cambridge Suburbs and Approaches Madingley Road Cambridge Suburbs and Approaches: Madingley Road Prepared by The Architectural History Practice Ltd For Cambridge City Council March 2009 Contents 1 CHARACTER SUMMARY 2 INTRODUCTION 2.1 Background 2.2 Methodology 2.3 Limitations 3 HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT 3.1 Brief overview of the development of Cambridge 3.2 The development of Madingley Road 4 CHARACTER ASSESSMENT 4.1 The Assessment Area 4.2 Overall Character and Appearance 4.3 Character Area 1 4.4...»

«Information Sheet R Torrey, Jay Linn, 1852-1920. 218 Scrapbook, 1893-1920. One volume.MICROFILM This collection is available at The State Historical Society of Missouri. If you would like more information, please contact us at shsresearch@umsystem.edu. This is a scrapbook of Jay L. Torrey of Howell County, Missouri. Torrey was a rancher, politician, veteran of the Spanish-American War, and promoter of southern Missouri. The scrapbook includes material on the Missouri Immigration Society, the...»

«THE RANCH-TYPE HOUSE: EVOLUTION, EVALUATION, AND PRESERVATION by MICHAEL KEVIN CHAPMAN (Under the Direction of Wayde A. Brown) ABSTRACT As buildings from the ‘recent past’ approach fifty years in age, the question of how to preserve these cultural resources is raised. This thesis considered one of those ‘recent past’ buildings: the Ranch-type house. Based upon an examination of the origins and development of the Ranch-type house and the architects who designed them in Georgia, the...»

«The 2009 Elections and Iran’s Changing Political Landscape by Mehran Kamrava Mehran Kamrava is the Interim Dean of Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service in Qatar and the Director of the School’s Center for International and Regional Studies. His most recent books include Iran’s Intellectual Revolution (2008) and The Modern Middle East: A Political History Since the First World War (2005). Abstract: Iran’s June 2009 elections set into motion four processes that are central...»

«The Sociality of Domestic Environments 1. The Historical Shaping of the Home Document ID Equator IRC D1.1 Status Final Type Deliverable Version 1.3 Date August 2001 Task 1. Andy Crabtree Authors Terry Hemmings © The Equator IRC, ESPRC Project GR/N15986/01 Project coordinator: Tom Rodden The School of Computer Science and Information Technology The University of Nottingham Jubilee Campus Wollaton Road Nottingham NG8 1BB United Kingdom Tel. 0115 846 6896 Fax. 0115 951 4254 Email....»

«THE THREE SISTERS TRIED AND TRUE RECIPES OF BUTTE MONTANA Dr. Lyn Olsen Chapter 1: 3 Sisters Tried and True Recipes Page 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter 1: History of Butte Chapter 2: Appetizers/Others Chapter 3: Main Dishes Chapter 4: Sides Chapter 5: Breads Chapter 6: Desserts Chapter 7: Hints Chapter 1: 3 Sisters Tried and True Recipes Page 4 Chapter 1 History This is a collection of hundreds of recipes tested over many years from friends and family in Butte, Montana, which are just as vividly...»

«Let’s Make a History Timeline Notebook. By Cindy Rushton Let’s Make a History Timeline Notebook! By Cindy Rushton Let’s Make a History Timeline Notebook! By Cindy Rushton Copyright 2005 by Cindy Rushton. All rights reserved. Rushton Family Ministries, 1225 Christy Lane, Tuscumbia, Alabama 35674. Website: http://www.CindyRushton.com. Phone 1888-HSBOOKS. Email: Cindy@CindyRushton.com Let’s Make a History Timeline Notebook! By: Cindy Rushton Published in the United States of America by:...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.