WWW.DISSERTATION.XLIBX.INFO
FREE ELECTRONIC LIBRARY - Dissertations, online materials
 
<< HOME
CONTACTS



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 79 |

«DIVERSITAS First Open Science Conference 2005: Travel Fund for Scientists from Developing Countries in the Asia Pacific Region Final report for APN ...»

-- [ Page 1 ] --

Asia‐Pacific Network for Global Change Research

DIVERSITAS First Open

Science Conference 2005:

Travel Fund for Scientists

from Developing Countries in

the Asia Pacific Region

Final report for APN project 2005-11-NSY-Bawa

The following collaborators worked on this project:

Kamaljit S. Bawa, Ashoka Trust for Research in Ecology and the

Environment, India, kamal.bawa@umb.edu

Keping Ma, Institute of Botany Beijing, China, makp@brim.ac.cn Tohru Nakashizuka, Research Institute for Humanity and Nature Kyoto, Japan, toron@chikyu.ac.jp Other logos may be placed here 1 DIVERSITAS Open Science Conference 2005: Travel Fund for Scientists from Developing Countries in the Asia Pacific Region 2005-11-NSY-Bawa Final Report submitted to APN ©Asia-Pacific Network for Global Change Research 2 Overview of project work and outcomes Non-technical summary DIVERSITAS, the international programme dedicated to biodiversity science, placed under the auspices of ICSU, IUMS, IUBS, SCOPE and UNESCO, received a grant from APN to provide travel assistance to scientists from developing countries of the Asia

Pacific region to attend the DIVERSITAS First Open Science Conference entitled:

“Integrating biodiversity science for human well being”, which took place in Oaxaca, Mexico, 9-12 November 2005. Only scientists who actively participated in the conference, with a selected

Abstract

were funded. Part of the funds was used to invite key speakers known to the DIVERSITAS community, and part was used to support scientists new to DIVERSITAS, selected on the quality of their abstract, with the intent to get them interested in the objectives of DIVERSITAS. Eleven participants from the following countries were funded thanks to this grant: China, India, Philippines, Thailand, and Bangladesh.

Overall, the conference succeeded in attracting close to 700 scientists and policy makers from 60 countries, including a large proportion of young scientists, and scientists from developing countries. In addition to the APN objectives stated below, the conference produced a statement representing an important step on the way towards the establishment of a new international mechanism of scientific expertise for biodiversity.

Objectives

The main objectives of the project were:

1. To identify in the APN region, scientists related to DIVERSITAS scientific areas, not yet part of a network, to get them to know the DIVERSITAS programme.

2. To identify possible national representatives in countries where DIVERSITAS needs to be stronger. This includes, in particular, India and China, who are submitting this grant proposal.

3. To generally promote in the APN region the integrated approach of biodiversity science taken within DIVERSITAS to address biodiversity issues of high relevance in the Asia Pacific region (e.g. biodiversity changes and human health; carbon sequestration capacity of diverse tropical forests, etc.).

Amount received and number years supported 2005-2006: 15,000 USD ; one year Activity undertaken Funds were used to fund participation of 11 scientists from the Asia Pacific region to the First DIVERSITAS Open Science Conference. APN funded participants actively contributed to the conference, by presenting one or several talks or organising a symposium. K Ma (China) gave a presentation on main biodiversity scientific programmes in China (National Committees meeting); K Bawa (India/USA) organised a symposium on sustaining partnerships for community-based conservation; A Sridhar (India) gave a talk on community-based approaches to marine conservation in India; B Sinha (India) talked about assessing traditional institutions for conservations in India;

Priyadarsanan Dharma Rajan (India) gave a talk related to agrobiodiversity; J Gladwin 3 (India) was an invited speaker at a symposium on agrobiodiversity; V Amoroso (Philippines) talked about participatory inventory of plants in Natural Parks in the Philippines; E Webb (Thailand) was an invited speaker at a symposium on remote sensing and biodiversity; A Ramana was an invited speaker at a symposium on implementation of multilateral agreements as they apply to plant genetic resources (India).

All abstracts are posted on the DIVERSITAS web site.

Results The objectives were met since: 1) The conference attracted a wider than foreseen audience from 60 countries who signaled their interest to get involved into the activities of the DIVERSITAS cross-cutting networks and core projects, and to take the interdisciplinary approach promoted by DIVERSITAS; 2) Additional contacts were taken in countries which do not have yet a national committee, particularly in Asia (e.g.

India, Philippines), Africa (Kenya, Morocco), and Eastern Europe; 3) Following symposiums and round tables, the conference adopted the “Oaxaca declaration” which commits the community to lobby for and get involved in the initial steps towards an International Mechanism of Scientific Expertise on Biodiversity (IMoSEB), similar to an IPCC for biodiversity.

Relevance to APN scientific research framework and objectives The entire conference was dedicated to the theme of the “change in terrestrial and marine biodiversity”. This included the “human dimension” aspect of biodiversity change, as DIVERSITAS was designed, from the onset, as an integrated programme, with, as a mission, to promote an integrative biodiversity science, linking biological, ecological and social disciplines in an effort to produce socially relevant new knowledge. All core projects of DIVERSITAS include a human dimension. Some sessions, including one symposium, proposed by Paul W. Leadley (University of Paris, Orsay) and Sandra Lavorel (CNRS, Grenoble, France) was dedicated to the impact of climate change on biological diversity, and to the feedback mechanisms of biodiversity changes on climate.





Emphasis was placed throughout the programme on input to policy making, at the regional level, and in the context of international conventions.

Self evaluation The proponents of the proposal (as well as all participants) were very pleased with all aspects of the conference, and feel that they met the objectives of the proposal.

Potential for further work All the contacts taken in Oaxaca are now being nurtured to firm up the establishment of new national committees, and the involvement of scientists new to DIVERSITAS from the APN region. The DIVERSITAS secretariat is also actively following up on the Oaxaca declaration, and the initiative to create an International Mechanism of Scientific Expertise on Biodiversity, with involvement of all regions of the world.

Publications Perrings, C, Jackson L, Bawa K, Brussaard L, Brush S, Gavin T, Papa R, Pascual U, and de Ruiter P. 2006. Biodiversity in agricultural landscapes: saving natural capital without losing interest; Editorial. Conservation Biology 20: 263 Bawa K, 2006. Globally dispersed local challenges in conservation biology.

Conservation Biology 20:696-9.

–  –  –

Acknowledgments The DIVERSITAS community thanks APN for providing a grant to support the First DIVERSITAS Open Science Conference, and START for managing the APN funds.

Minimum 2pages (maximum 4 pages)

–  –  –

Preface DIVERSITAS, the international programme dedicated to biodiversity science, received a grant from APN to contribute to its first Open Science Conference. The Conference entitled “Integrating biodiversity science for human well-being” took place in Oaxaca, Mexico, from 9 to 12 November 2005. The conference assembled many perspectives from the natural and social sciences to highlight the causes and consequences of biodiversity loss, following closely the launch of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.

The grant received from APN was used to support scientists from the Asia Pacific region to attend and present their research.

Table of Contents

1.0 Introduction

2.0 Conference Outputs

3.0 APN-Funded Participants

4.0 Conclusions References Appendix 1 Conferences/Symposia/Workshops Agenda/Programme (including title, date and venue) Participants list (comprising contact details of each participant, including organisation, address, phone number, fax number, and email address) 2 Funding sources outside the APN A list of agencies, institutions, organisations (governmental, inter-governmental and/or non-governmental), that provided any in-kind support or co-funding and the amount(s) awarded.

3 Glossary of Terms Include list of acronyms and abbreviations 4 In the Appendix section, the report may also include:

Abstracts, Power Point Slides of conference/symposia/workshop presentations Conference/symposium/workshop reports 6

1.0 Introduction Introduce the project, moving from the broader issues to your specific objectives, finishing the section with the precise aims of the project.

Background Approximately four years ago, in 2001, International Council for Science (ICSU), the International Union of Biological Sciences (IUBS), the International Union for Microbiological Societies (IUMS), the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE), and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), asked the scientific community to build a new global change programme dedicated to biodiversity science, i.e., a new DIVERSITAS. DIVERSITAS had been instrumental since its inception in the early 90’s in framing biodiversity research questions. There was now a need to take into account a more dynamic and integrated approach to biodiversity science, and to build a new structure to address these questions.

In addition to the key field of discovering new species and conserving biodiversity, new questions were emerging, on the causes of biodiversity loss, on its potential consequences for ecosystem functioning and “services”, and on how human and social processes interacted to affect biodiversity. Following a series of consultations and meetings DIVERSITAS identified three main priority axes –or “core projects”- and published its science plan in 2002, followed by core projects science plans. During that period (2001-02), DIVERSITAS became a founding member of the Earth System Science Partnership, or ESSP, which includes three other global change programmes: IGBP (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme), IHDP (International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change), and WCRP (World Climate Research Programme).

The Oaxaca conference was the first open science conference of DIVERSITAS, and the first international conference of this kind, entirely dedicated to the many facets of biodiversity science. The conference was organized by the DIVERSITAS Scientific Committee, with a strong lead by the Mexican and US National Committees of DIVERSITAS.

Presentation and objectives of the Conference The conference assembled many perspectives from the natural and social sciences to highlight the causes and consequences of biodiversity loss. Following closely the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment launch, it examined changes in beneficial ecosystem services and the economic consequences of biodiversity loss. The conference featured a mix of plenary lectures, symposium, oral and poster sessions, presented by invited speakers, as well as scientists selected from a call for abstracts on the three following themes: 1) How is biodiversity changing, and why? 2) What are the consequences of biodiversity changes for ecosystems and for the delivery of ecosystem services? 3) What can we do to promote a more sustainable use of biodiversity and improve human well-being?

The overall objectives of the conference were:

1 To convene scientists representing the full DIVERSITAS spectrum, that is, many perspectives from the natural and social sciences to highlight the linkages from biodiversity to ecological functions to ecosystem services, as well as the consequences of damaging economic activities ignoring such linkages;

2 Promote scientific exchanges;

–  –  –

Objectives of APN grant

The main objectives of the APN grant were:

1 To identify in the APN region, scientists related to DIVERSITAS scientific areas, not yet part of a network, to get them to know the DIVERSITAS programme.

2 To identify possible national representatives in countries where DIVERSITAS needs to be stronger. This includes, in particular, India and China, who are submitting this grant proposal.

3 To generally promote in the APN region the integrated approach of biodiversity science taken within DIVERSITAS to address biodiversity issues of high relevance in the Asia Pacific region (e.g. biodiversity changes and human health; carbon sequestration capacity of diverse tropical forests, etc.).

2.0 Conference Outputs List the outputs here with a description of each. Links can also be included here to the DIVERSITAS websites (outputs may also be placed in the appendix section of CDROMS – see appropriate section).

This was the first international conference of this type entirely dedicated to the many facets of biodiversity science. The conference was a success, attracting close to 700 scientists and policy makers from 60 countries, including a large proportion of young scientists and participants from developing countries. The conference received wide press coverage with more than 100 press articles worldwide, and an editorial in Science, on the opening of the conference (Science, vol 310, 11 Nov 2005, Dirzo R. and M. Loreau, “Biodiversity science evolves”).

The outputs of the conference as they related to the activities of APN funded

participants are listed below in 5 subsections:



Pages:   || 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 |   ...   | 79 |


Similar works:

«1 Z.J. Farris Curriculum vitae Zach J. Farris, PhD Adjunct Faculty ∞ Postdoc Researcher ∞ Virginia Tech Address: 124 Cheatham Hall Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 Phone: (540) 818 0119: Fax (540) 231-7580 Email : zjfarris@vt.edu Website: www.zachfarris.yolasite.com Post-doc research: www.maddoginitiative.com EDUCATION 2014 Ph.D. Virginia Tech (Dept. of Fish & Wildlife Conservation). Dissertation: “Carnivore ecology across the Masoala-Makira...»

«A453 Widening M1 Junction 24 to A52 Nottingham Environmental Statement Volume 1 January 2009 PART 3 : DISRUPTION DUE TO CONSTRUCTION 3.1 Methodology Introduction This assessment considers the potential disruption within the study area (see 3.1.6 3.1.1 below) resulting from the construction phase (as opposed to the operation of the completed road once opened for use) of the project. In most cases, effects during construction have been assessed as part of the specialist scheme environmental...»

«Sediment Dynamics and the Hydromorphology of Fluvial Systems (Proceedings of a symposium held in 487 Dundee, UK, July 2006). IAHS Publ. 306, 2006. A gradient or mosaic of patches? The textural character of inset-flood plain surfaces along a dryland river system MARK SOUTHWELL & MARTIN THOMS Water Research Lab, Institute of Applied Ecology, University of Canberra, Australia Central Territory 2601, Australia m.southwell@student.canberra.edu.au Abstract This paper investigated the textural...»

«VRIJE UNIVERSITEIT The Ecology of Bacterial Individuality ACADEMISCH PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad Doctor aan de Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, op gezag van de rector magnificus prof.dr. L.M. Bouter, in het openbaar te verdedigen ten overstaan van de promotiecommissie van de faculteit der Aarden Levenswetenschappen op dinsdag 27 maart 2012 om 13.45 uur in de aula van de universiteit, De Boelelaan 1105 door Mitja Nandi Paul Remus-Emsermann geboren te Siegburg, Duitsland promotoren:...»

«California Halibut Paralichthys californicus ©Monterey Bay Aquarium U.S. Pacific Bottom gillnet, Bottom trawl, Hook and line November 4, 2013 Kelsey James, Consulting Researcher Disclaimer Seafood Watch® strives to ensure all our Seafood Reports and the recommendations contained therein are accurate and reflect the most up-to-date evidence available at time of publication. All our reports are peerreviewed for accuracy and completeness by external scientists with expertise in ecology,...»

«Oil Shale, 2012, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 76–84 ISSN 0208-189X doi: 10.3176/oil.2012.1.07 © 2012 Estonian Academy Publishers ALUM SHALES CAUSING RADON RISKS ON THE EXAMPLE OF MAARDU AREA, NORTH-ESTONIA K. JÜRIADO*(a), A. RAUKAS(b), V. PETERSELL(c) (a) Tallinn University Narva mnt 25, 10120 Tallinn, Estonia (b) Institute of Ecology at Tallinn University Uus-Sadama 5, 10120 Tallinn, Estonia (c) Geological Survey of Estonia Kadaka tee 82, 12618 Tallinn, Estonia The Maardu area is among the most...»

«THIRTY YEARS AFTER A TREE-PLANTING PROJECT: A POLITICAL ECOLOGY PERSPECTIVE ON BEHAVIOR AND LAND CHANGES IN RURAL HAITI By ANDREW TARTER A THESIS PRESENTED TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 2010 1 © 2010 Andrew Tarter 2 To my family, the Tarters, who love Haiti 3 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS All steps in the course of a lifetime lead to the present moment, and my case is no exception; many...»

«Journal of the Lepidopterists' SOciety 49(1), 1995, 6-23 THE BIOGEOGRAPHY AND ECOLOGY OF EUPHYES DUKESI (HESPERIIDAE) IN FLORIDA JOHN V. CALHOUN l 1731 San Mateo Drive, Dunedin, Florida 34698, USA ABSTRACT. A distinctive endemic phenotype of Euphyes dukesi (Lindsey) was first discovered in Florida in 1971. The endemic nature of Floridian populations was only recently recognized, and the populations currently remain undescribed. Pleistocene glacial events probably contributed to the isolation of...»

«SONIC WARFARE Technologies of Lived Abstraction Brian Massumi and Erin Manning, editors Relationscapes: Movement, Art, Philosophy, Erin Manning,  Without Criteria: Kant, Whitehead, Deleuze, and Aesthetics, Steven Shaviro,  Sonic Warfare: Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear, Steve Goodman,  SONIC WARFARE Sound, Affect, and the Ecology of Fear Steve Goodman The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England ©  Massachusetts Institute of...»

«LA CONTEMPLACIÓN PARA ALCANZAR AMOR Y LA ECOLOGÍA1 La Contemplación para Alcanzar en la dinámica de los EE Para situar la Contemplación para Alcanzar Amor CAA en el texto de los EE, podemos tener presente lo que se podríamos llamar la dinámica, el movimiento de los EE. Una moción presupone una representación espacial, donde sucede un movimiento; tiene un inicio, un medio y un fin. Una moción de consolación o de desolación es un movimiento que se produce en nosotros, que empieza,...»

«Kabbalah and Ecology: God’s Image in the More-Than-Human World, David Seidenberg, Cambridge University Press, 2015 – 6/26/2015 Bibliography Organized according to the following sections: Published in Kabbalah and Ecology: Classical rabbinic literature and pre-rabbinic literature (primary sources through the eighth century) Medieval Jewish thought – philosophy and Kabbalah (primary sources, ninth to the seventeenth century) Chasidut (Hasidism), early modern Jewish thought, and modern...»

«Historical/cultural ecology of the Tohono O'odham nation Item type text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic) Authors Seivertson, Bruce Lynn Publisher The University of Arizona. Rights Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author. Downloaded...»





 
<<  HOME   |    CONTACTS
2016 www.dissertation.xlibx.info - Dissertations, online materials

Materials of this site are available for review, all rights belong to their respective owners.
If you do not agree with the fact that your material is placed on this site, please, email us, we will within 1-2 business days delete him.