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«Make your own weather station. Ask students to make either a rain gauge, wind vane or thermometer box and then record their measurements in a weather ...»

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Episode 1

Questions for discussion th

5 February 2013

Wild Weather

1. Summarise the Wild Weather story.

2. What Australian states have recently been hit with extreme weather?

3. What types of extreme weather did these parts of Australia experience?

4. What is the name of the ex-tropical cyclone that recently hit the coast of Queensland?

5. Due to flooding thousands of people in Bundaberg recently had to ___________ their homes.

6. In the BtN story, Sarah wanted to find out why we are getting all this wild weather so she visited the

Bureau of:

a. Meteorology b. Archaeology c. Astronomy

7. Why would you normally see more cyclones in summer?

8. What factors can increase the severity of a bushfire?

9. How did this story make you feel?

10. Illustrate an aspect of the Wild Weather story.

Make your own weather station. Ask students to make either a rain gauge, wind vane or thermometer box and then record their measurements in a weather diary.

www.metoffice.gov.uk/education/kids/things-to-do/weather-station Tassie Bushfire

1. Discuss the Tassie Bushfire story with another student.

2. What happened in Dunalley Tasmania recently?

3. Describe the weather conditions in Tasmania during the bushfires.

4. In your own words describe the damage caused.

5. What did people in Dunalley do to stay safe during the bushfires?

6. How did the community help each other during the bushfires?

7. The kids in the story were able to go back to school at the beginning of the year. True or false?

8. How do you think the kids in this story felt during and after the bushfire?

9. How did this story make you feel?

10. Think of three questions you would like to ask the kids in this story.

Show your support for the kids going back to school in Dunalley Tasmania. Post a message on the Behind the News Guestbook www.abc.net.au/btn/ Flag Debate

1. Before watching the BtN Flag Debate story, predict what the story is about.

2. Name the three symbols on the Australian flag?

3. What country does the Union Jack come from?

4. Why does Australia have the Union Jack on its flag?

5. What is the Southern Cross?

©ABC 2013

6. Why was an extra point added to the Federation Star symbol?

7. What sorts of places would you see the Australian flag flying?

8. Why do some people want to change the Australian flag?

9. Do you think the Australian flag should be changed? Explain your answer.

10. What colours and symbols do you think best represent Australia?

Do you think the Australian flag should be changed? To vote head to the BtN website www.abc.net.au/btn School Economics

1. What new subject will all primary school kids be learning at school?

2. Discuss as a class what is meant by the term economics?

3. Make a list of words that you associate with the word economics.

4. Why does the Education Minister think it will be useful learning about economics?

Name an economic disaster that’s happened in the past few years.

5.

6. Learning about economics will be useful when you have to:

a. Take out a car loan b. Apply for a credit card c. Complete your tax return d. All of the above

7. Why are some people opposed to the idea of teaching economics in school?

8. Do you think kids should be learning about economics in school? Explain your answer.

9. What did you learn from watching this story?

10. Brainstorm with your teacher fun and interesting ways that you can learn about economics and business in the classroom.

Create a simple budget for a class fundraising event. Refer to The Australian Curriculum “Create simple financial plans” http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Curriculum/ContentDescription/ACMNA106 Ball Kids

1. In your own words describe what the story Ball Kids was about?

2. In what sport would you find a ball kid?

a. Football b. Tennis c. Soccer

3. What world tennis tournament were the ball kids in this story a part of?

4. What is the role of a ball kid?

5. Name two well known tennis players that started out as ball kids?

6. How long do you need to train for to become a ball kid at the Australian Open?

7. How many ball kids make up the squad?

8. Which tennis player smashed seven racquets during a tennis match?

9. Which kids won the ball kid award this year at the Australian Open?

10. How much money did the best ball boy and girl win?

Test your knowledge in the Ball Kids BtN quiz. Go to the BtN website and follow the links.

–  –  –

Wild Weather Key Learning Students will investigate how extreme weather events can impact on people, plants, animals and landscape, both in Australia and in the Asia region.

–  –  –

Focus Questions

1. Summarise the Wild Weather story.

2. What Australian states have recently been hit with extreme weather?





3. What types of extreme weather did these parts of Australia experience?

4. What is the name of the ex-tropical cyclone that recently hit the coast of Queensland?

5. Due to flooding thousands of people in Bundaberg recently had to ___________ their homes.

6. In the BtN story, Sarah wanted to find out why we are getting all this wild weather so she visited the

Bureau of:

a. Meteorology b. Archaeology c. Astronomy ©ABC 2013

7. Why would you normally see more cyclones in summer?

8. What factors can increase the severity of a bushfire?

9. How did this story make you feel?

10. Illustrate an aspect of the Wild Weather story.

Activity Engagement After watching the BtN episode Wild Weather facilitate a class discussion. Here are some discussion

starters:

How did you feel after watching the story?

What are some examples of extreme weather? Consider weather events in Australia and around the world.

Have you ever experienced extreme weather?

How does it impact on people and the environment?

Exploration and Explanation Organise an excursion to your local science organisation or conduct online research to find out more about extreme weather and its impact on the landscape. Ask students to start a science journal to record their findings, ideas and questions as they learn.

How is weather measured?

What type of climate zone do you live in?

What is the difference between weather and climate?

How do you predict extreme weather?

Elaboration and Evaluation What are the climate zones in Australia?

Divide the class into six groups, and assign one of the following six climate zones to each group:

Equatorial Tropical Subtropical Desert Grassland Temperate Ask each group to research one of the six weather zones and present their findings in an interesting way.

Refer to these pictorial maps for inspiration http://mapcollection.wordpress.com/?s=australia.

Using your classroom interactive whiteboard, make an enlarged version of a map of Australia and trace onto butcher paper. Ask students to outline the states, capital cities and the different weather zones on the map.

Refer to the Bureau of Meteorology for a map which highlights the major classification groups.

http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/environ/other/kpn_group.shtml.

The effects of extreme weather Create a table using the headings below or appropriate headings of your own. Select one type of extreme event that could be linked to each effect and determine the impact it might have on people, animals and plants.

Provide students with enough time to conduct research using the internet, newspapers and other sources of information.

–  –  –

Further Investigation Consider an ecosystem in your own area. Describe the ecosystem. Perhaps you can photograph it. What might be the impacts on this ecosystem if temperature increased and rainfall decreased?

Make your own weather station. Ask students to make either a rain gauge, wind vane or thermometer box and then record their measurements in a weather diary. http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/education/kids/thingsto-do/weather-station  Related Research Links Bureau of Meteorology – Climate Zones Australia http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/environ/travel/map.shtml Bureau of Meteorology - About Tropical Cyclones http://www.bom.gov.au/cyclone/about/ Behind the News – Wild Weather http://www.abc.net.au/btn/story/s2981998.htm ABC News – Oswald creates weather chaos in Queensland (photos) http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-01-27/queensland-floods-as-oswald-moves-south/4486174 ABC Catalyst – Taking our temperature http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/3633447.htm CSIRO – Extreme Events http://www.csiro.au/en/Outcomes/Environment/Extreme-Events.aspx NSW Education and Communities – Under the Microscope: Climate Change http://www.microscope.edu.au/public/clips/documents/climate_change.pdf

–  –  –

Flag Debate Key Learning Students will learn about the meanings and uses of flags in Australia and investigate why flags are an important part of society.

–  –  –

Focus Questions

1. Before watching the BtN Flag Debate story, predict what the story is about.

2. Name the three symbols on the Australian flag?

3. What country does the Union Jack come from?

4. Why does Australia have the Union Jack on its flag?

5. What is the Southern Cross?

6. Why was an extra point added to the Federation Star symbol?

7. What sorts of places would you see the Australian flag flying?

8. Why do some people want to change the Australian flag?

9. Do you think the Australian flag should be changed? Explain your answer.

10. What colours and symbols do you think best represent Australia?

Activity What country does this flag represent?

Print a selection of flags from various countries around the world. Ask your students to name what country each flag represents. When you have finished this task use the flags as posters around the classroom.

(Alternatively use your classroom interactive whiteboard to refer to a selection of flags online).

©ABC 2013 After watching the BtN story Flag Debate invite students to participate in a class discussion. Find out what your students know about the Australian flag, what they learnt from the story and what questions they have

about the topic. Here are some discussion starters:

What elements make up the Australian flag? Ask students to consider symbols and colours used on the flag.

Do you know what the symbols on the Australian flag represent?

List some places where you would see the Australian flag.

What is the purpose of a national flag?

What messages do you think the Australian flag conveys?

Exploring symbols Divide the class into three groups and ask each group to research one of the symbols used on the Australian flag. Ask students to consider the symbols historical origins when conducting their research.

Students to investigate the Southern Cross o What is its scientific name?

o When and where is it used?

o Ask students to identify other constellations in the Australian sky.

Students to investigate the Union Jack.

o Where does it originate?

o Why is it included on the Australian flag?

o What other national flags include the Union Jack?

Students to investigate the Federation Star.

o What does it symbolise?

o Explore why this symbol was changed and when.

Consider completing this activity for other flags like the Aboriginal flag, Torres Strait Islander flag, Eureka Stockade flag and the Olympic flag.

Brainstorm some other symbols that you think represent Australia (for example the colours of green and gold, the opal, the golden wattle, aboriginal dreamtime, the kangaroo and emu).

The flag debate – “The Australian flag should be changed” Before preparing for your classroom debate invite students to participate in a class discussion on whether they think the Australian flag should be changed. Consider creating a SWOT chart on the Australian flag.

–  –  –

©ABC 2013 Preparing for your class debate A debate is traditionally held between two teams of three speakers. The speakers are given the same topic.

One team is called the ‘Affirmative’ and speaks in support of the topic. The other team is called the ‘Negative’ and speaks against the topic.

Other roles that can be assigned are chairperson, time keeper and the remaining class members can give feedback to the speakers. Discuss with students the length of time each speaker talks for. Students will need sufficient time to research the topic.

Once roles are assigned ask each team to prepare for the debate as per the following:

List your arguments and write in point form.

Highlight your five best points. These points will be used for the debate.

On cue cards, write in point form a beginning (introduction), middle (five best points) and ending for your speech.

Practise your speech using your cue cards.

Guide for giving feedback Was the information clear and accurate?

Were the arguments logical?

Were the counter arguments accurate and relevant?

Comments about the presentation style (tone of voice, body language, enthusiastic, convincing).

Reflection How difficult was it to think of points to support one side of the argument?

Do you think you would have done a better job supporting the other side of the argument?

“Should the Australian flag be changed?” Vote in the BtN online poll http://www.abc.net.au/btn/ Design your own flag – Your say Ask students to design a new Australian flag. Students will need to consider the 5 basic principles of flag

design, as per the following:



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